War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0851 Chapter LX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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his column. I wish You could send another regiment of cavalry up the Missouri to support the rear of Sully. Mustering out weakens our forces. I wrote You from Saint Paul before leaving on the 7th.

S. C. CURTIS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE NORTHWEST,

June 10, 1865.

General H. H. SIBLEY,

saint Paul:

A report from Fort Rice of 22nd ultimo, through General Sully, speaks of large combinations of Indians on Heart River threatening to come down on settlements. They again attacked the Fort and were repulsed. I wish You could get reports through from Rice. I send Major Weed with dispatches to General Sully.

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSOURI,

June 10, 1865 - 5. 20 p. m.

Brevet Major-General SULLY,

Sioux City:

Your dispatch of 8th and letter of 3rd received. It will not, I suppose, be practicable to keep Your whole command at Fort Rice for winter. Neither does General Curtis design to bind You down to particular points, as You suppose. The general object of Your movement only is pointed out. The manner and the route You must determine as circumstances arise. I desire You to do the best You can to bring Sioux Indians to peace.

JOHN POPE,

Major-General.

SIOUX CITY, June 10, 1865.

Major-General POPE,

Saint Louis:

GENERAL: There is a matter I wish to write to You unofficially, just as I would talk to You if I could see You, and that is in regard to Colonel Dimon, commanding First U. S. Volunteers and the post at Fort Rice. I admire his energy and pluck, the determination with which he carries out orders; but he is too young - too rash - for his position, and it would be well if he could be removed. He is making good deal of trouble for me, and eventually for You, in his overzealous desire to do his duty. Toward yourself and myself he is very friendly and anxious to carry out his instructions, and he is one of the best disciplinarians and most energetic men I have met with. Perhaps when I see him and talk to him I can change matters and curb him; but if I cannot do this, and I feel it necessary to act, I should like to have the authority to do so, and I think the best way would be an order making his headquarters in Minnesota, with his other battalion, or any way You may think best. I do not wish to hurt his feelings, but I think the interests of the Government would be advanced by having an older and cooler head at Fort Rice. This regiment was raised and organized by Ben. Butler, and he is too much like him in his actions for an Indian county, but he