War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0830 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS- MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LX.

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its armament removed, and the fortifications razed. That the Sixteenth Indiana (mounted) Infantry remain on duty between the Mississippi and Grand Rivers unto its term expires, at which time the probability is that no mounted troops will be longer required. This arrangement will render available for immediate duty in the front or elsewhere the Seventy- eighth Colored infantry, the balance of the Seventy- fifth and Ninety- eighth colored Infantry, the third Rhode Island Cavalry, the Twenty- fifth New York Light Battery, the Missouri Light Battery (dismounted), and after the evacuation of Plaquemine one battalion of the Eleventh Colored Heavy Artillery.

Very respectfully, Your obedient servant,

T. W. SHERMAN,

Brevet Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS SOUTHERN DIVISION OF LOUISIANA,

New Orleans, June 9, 1865.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT- GENERAL, DEPARTMENT OFT HE GULF:

In response to the third paragraph of General Orders, Numbers 81, Department of the Gulf, just received, I have the honor to report that the last tri- monthly report of this command (May 31) shows the numbers and condition of the troops of this command at this time, excepting that five companies of Ninety- eighth and three companies of Seventy- fifth Colored Infantry and one company o Louisiana cavalry have been thrown out from Brashear to the front since that date. That portion of the railroad between Terre Bonne and Bayou Boeuf is submerged, rendering it necessary for the present to supply Brashear by sea route. All other posts are supplied by steamers, except Thibodeaux and stations on railroad, which still have the advantage of the rail. This road will not be in operation throughout its length until the waters fall and some repairs are made upon the submerged portion.

Very respectfully, Your obedient servant,

T. W. SHERMAN,

Brevet Major- General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS NORTHERN DIVISION OF LOUISIANA,

Shreveport, La., June 9, 1865.

Colonel A. C. MATTHEWS,

Commissioner:

MY DEAR SIR: You will proceed with as little [delay] as possible to Fort Townson, and from that point to Council Grove, where a grand council is now being held, at which the different tribes of Indians in their Territory and Western Texas are represented, and will present to Governor Throckmorton and Colonel Reagan, the commissioners of the Confederate States, the official documents in Your possession addressed to them. These commissioners will give You every assistance in their power in accomplishing the object of Your mission, which is to make a temporary treaty or alliance with the Indians on behalf of the United States. You can state to the council that the war between the Confederate Army having surrendered and turned over all arms and public property to the agents of the United States; that hereafter the