War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0827 Chapter LX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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is much more for the Crows, who are also friendly. The section of country now occupied by Cheyennes and other hostile Indians is of such a nature it will take a long time and some trouble to completely drive them out. It is, besides, a good country for game, berries, and wild fruit. Eventually it will be well to have troops stationed at Fort Benton, or near there, but it will be next to an impossibility to get the necessary supplies there this year, for they already report the river falling above.

With much respect, Your obedient servant,

ALF. SULLY,

Brevet Major-General.

CHICAGO, June 8, 1865.

(Received 4. 15 p. m.)

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Pursuant to Your orders I have given directions for the immediate discharge of all volunteer troops in the Northern Department, except the Eighty- eighth and One hundred and twenty- eighth Ohio Volunteers and the Veteran Reserve Corps. The Eighty- eighth is stationed at Camp Chase, and the One hundred and twenty- eighth at Johnson's Island. The interests of the service require that these regiments shall be retained a few weeks longer.

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major- General, Commanding.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE SOUTHWEST,

New Orleans, June 9, 1865- 10. 35 a. m. (Received 3 p. m. 10th)

Bvt. Colonel C. B. COMSTOCK,

Assistant Adjutant- General:

I find here all the pontoon equipment I shall want.

P. H. SHERIDAN,

Major- General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE SOUTHWEST,

New Orleans, June 9, 1865 (Received 10. 30 p. m. 10th)

Lieutenant-General GRANT,

Washington:

The following is the latest information I have from the Rio Grande:

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES,

Brownsville, Tex., May 30, 1865.

Colonel J. S. CROSBY,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of the Gulf:

I have the honor to report that IO moved on this place from Brazos de Santiago the evening of the 28th instant, and arrived here at daylight this morning. The enemy evacuated the place, having first delivered six pieces of artillery, battery wagons, forge, and transportation wagons to the Mexican commander at Matamoras and sent a large amount of cotton across the Rio Grande. We captured 500 bales of cotton and several hundred head of cattle, with a few mules and horses. The rebel forces on the Rio Grande are greatly demoralized and nearly broken up by desertion. The reports of the confinement of General Slaughter by