War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0800 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LX.

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HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSOURI, June 6, 1865-2. 45 p. m.

General SULLY,

Sioux City:

You will invite the attention of the Congressional investigating committee to history of the removal of the Winnebago Indians and everything connected with the Crow Creek Agency. If you have an officer who is fully posted about Indian treaty making and other acts of Indian agents you had better send him with the committee to call their attention to the whole system. The examination into Indian affairs is very important, and if thoroughly made cannot fail to lead to the most beneficial results both to the Indians and the Government.

JOHN. POPE,

Major-General.

SIOUX CITY, June 6, 1865.

(Received 8th.)

Major-General CURTIS:

The commanding officer at Fort Rice reports (May 22) Cheyenne, Sioux, and other Indians, several thousand lodges, collected on Heart River. Say they are going to clean out the upper country. The most of them came from the Platte Valley. The friendly Sioux Indians are coming into Fort Rice. A part of the Cheyennes attacked the fort again, but were repulsed.

SULLY,

General.

HEADQUARTERS NORTHWEST INDIAN EXPEDITION, Sioux City, Iowa, June 6, 1865.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, DEPT. OF THE NORTHWEST:

SIR: I have just received a very important communication, dated May 22, from Fort Rice, which I report. The general will recollect I reported that there were some 3,000 lodges of Sioux Indians on the Heart River, and sent world they would come into Fort Rice. Some of them have come in and report that the Platte Valley Indians, Cheyennes and others, have joined this camp. They have learned that troops are after them and they are trying to get all the Sioux to join them. Large numbers have; how many is not known. Several of the friendly ones have come and encamped near Fort Rice. The intention of the Platte Indians and other hostile ones is to abandon the country south of the Big Cheyenne River, but intend to hold the upper country, which is well filled with buffalo and other game, and in order to do this they are going to commence to clean out all posts, commencing with Rice. It is also said they are well armed and supplies with ammunition by the English half-breeds, who urge them to make war. If these Indians would only remain in the country north of Cheyenne and let the posts and passing boats alone it would be a blessing to all, for I do not think a same white man will ever want to go into that country. Indians still continue to annoy Fort Rice; they are Cheyennes and others. A sentinel was badly wounded on the night of the 10th, and on the evening of the 22nd a large force drove the men from the saw-mill into the block-house. The saw-mill is located on a creek half a mile from the fort. I caused to be built, on a hill close by, a block-house to protect this mill and the stables, in which is stationed a