War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0797 Chapter LX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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robberies, and outrages they have committed for over a year; and unless we have a settled policy, either fight and allow the commanding officer of the department to dictate terms of peace to them, or else it be decided that we are not to fight, but make some kind of peace at all hazards, we will squander the summer without result. Indians will rob and murder, and some Indian agents will defend them, and when fall comes I will be held responsible for not having protected the route or punished them for what they may have done. It must be evident to Government that I cannot be making war on Indians while other parties are at the same time making peace, as has been the case so far. Whatever may be the desire of Government, I will lend all my energies to carry it out and make every officer and man under me do the same. I cannot approve the manner the Indians have been treated, and have no faith in, nor will I allow such treatment as shown at the Big Sandy fight. If peace is concluded I trust that their reservations may be made at safe distances from overland route as possible, and that they be made to keep away from it.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. M. DODGE,

Major-General.

STATE OF MISSOURI, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, City of Jefferson, June 6, 1865.

Major General JOHN POPE,

Commanding Mil. Div. of the Mo. and Ark., Saint Louis, Mo.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of yours of 30th of May. My dispatch asking in general terms that Colonel Harding be directed to assist me in enforcing the law was certainly too broad and wholly inadmissible. It was sent hurriedly, and it now seems, under a misapprehension of the facts on my part. I understood that a writ was in the hands of a proper officer, and that he was unable to execute it for want of force; and in another instance just then brought to my knowledge the officers of the law were in Benton County the leaders of the lawless party, which is the case at present; and it was my desire then, as it is now, to obtain the services of a discreet officer and a company of men at Warsaw to protect the people from outrages of men who are in civil office, and who have defeated all my efforts to organize a company of militia in that county. I beg to assure you that it will be my highest ambition in the future, as in the past, the restore the civil law, and for your ready co-operation in this effort I shall ever feel grateful.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THO. C. FLETCHER.

HEADQUARTERS POST OF LICKING, TEXAS COUNTY, MO., Licking, Mo., June 6, 1865.

Colonel MORRILL,

Commanding District of Rolla, Rolla, Mo.:

SIR: I have been credibly informed that a scout of soldiers came in on the head of Big Piney, Texas County, Mo., on or about the 3rd day of June, and committed a great many depredations upon the citizens, pillaged and robbed several houses, and killed one man after he had told them that he had surrendered and was paroled. Swore that they