War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0760 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LX.

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MACON, June 3, 1865.

Colonel J. H. BAKER,

Provost-Marshal-General, Saint Louis:

I have prepared no report of Truman's operations. He attempted to secure the surrender of guerrilla bands, and after an absence of twice the time agreed upon was obliged to return without accomplishing anything. In my opinion killing them is the best method of procuring their surrender, and this is being quite rapidly done at present.

W. T. CLARKE,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSOURI, June 3, 1865-3. 25 p. m.

Major-General BLUNT,

Fort Gibson:

The surrender of Kirby Smith changes whole aspect of affairs. Changes are being made everywhere. Your position and station not yet fixed. Will write further in a few days.

JOHN. POPE,

Major-General.

HDQRS. FIRST SUB-DISTRICT OF SOUTH KANSAS, Fort Scott, Kans., June 3, 1865.

Captain J. H. WAITE,

Company C, Seventeenth Illinois Cavalry:

On relieving Captain Smith on the Trading Post he will turn over to you such instructions (verbal) as have been given him. I wish that you would establish a system of scouting, commencing with the company of the Fifth Kansas, stationed north of you. Instructions will be sent them to scout as far south as midway between your station and theirs, which is Coldwater Grove. A company of infantry is south of you at Land Settlement and Mine Creek. You should communicate with them as often as twice a week. They will be replaced by cavalry in a few days. I have instructed Captain Smith to leave a good reliable sergeant with you, one who knows the country and people; he can remain for a fortnight. There is a post-office and telegraph station at Mound City, by which you can communicate with these headquarters. All mail except such as reaches you by couriers will be sent there. Keep your men well in hand, and husband the strength of the horses except when on duty. Be careful and place scouting parties in charge of such non-commissioned officers as will prevent any impropriety on the part of the men. Encourage the recourse to civil law in all difficulties except such as are purely military in their nature, or where necessity demands your interference. Everything seems to be quiet at present, but it is no guaranty as to the future, judging by the past. This, with what verbal instructions will be given you by Captain Smith, will be your guidance until further notice.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. B. PEARSALL,

Colonel Forty-eighth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, Commanding.