War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0738 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LX.

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[Inclosure Numbers 4.]

HEADQUARTERS FREEMAN'S BRIGADE,

May 29, 1865.

Major W. C. LE FEVER,

Commanding U. S. Forces:

MAJOR: Your communication of 27th instant is received and contents properly noted. Sir, I would say to you in reply that my command, together with all others in Northern Sub-District of Arkansas, were surrendered to the U. S. authorities by General Thompson, which will be complete on the 5th of JUNE next. However, I have some soldiers at their homes and on other business absent from the command. You will, I trust, respect and parole them according to the usages in such cases. I have met to-day for the purpose of making arrangements to move to Jacksonport on the 5th.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. R. FREEMAN,

Colonel, Commanding, &c.

GLASGOW, June 2, 1865.

General SPALDING:

Three bushwhackers and one Confederate soldier surrendered this morning to Captain Denny at Roanoke.

A. F. DENNY,

Colonel.

GLASGOW, June 2, 1865.

Brevet Brigadier-General SPALDING:

Clement is reported with some half-dozen men six miles from Fayette this morning, going southeast. It is thought he is trying to form a junction with Anderson. Captain Harris, of the Fayette Missouri Militia, is after him. Will order men from this post, Roanoke, and Huntsville in pursuit. Lieutenant Grotjan, of Keytesville, and Captain Forbes, of this place, were on his track all day yesterday. It is so dry they could not follow his trail.

A. F. DENNY,

Colonel.

HEADQUARTERS EAST SUB-DISTRICT OF THE PLAINS,

Fort Kearny, Nebr. Ter., June 2, 1865.

Captain GEORGE F. PRICE,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, Dist of the Plains, Julesburg, Colo. Ter.:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of 29th instant, giving instructions as to course to be pursued with the Pawnee Indians, and to transmit herewith copy of letter addressed to Mr. Lushbaugh, agent of that tribe, which explains itself. I will start for their village, as soon as I get a small force of cavalry together with which to visit them. I am satisfied, from all the accounts I have received, that the chiefs and majority of the tribe are in no wise implicated in the affair of the 18th ultimo on the Little Blue River; on the contrary, the evidences heretofore given by this tribe of their friendly disposition to the whites are strengthened lately by the conduct of their principal men. Some few vagabonds of the tribe are the guilty