War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0732 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LX.

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is not abundantly sufficient if properly posted and handled. There are many other reasons why troops are demanded on the frontier beside fear of Indians. At all events, I cannot consider it judicious to leave an officer in command in Minnesota who is so evidently 'stampeded," or appears to be, with so large a force at his command. His very apprehension will create among the people all the consequence of an actual Indian invasion on a scale unknown to our history. I trust you will read General Sibley's letter, as it seems to me to indicate a state of mind not encouraging to any hope of peace and quiet in Minnesota.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN POPE,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, Mo., June 2, 1865.

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

General-in-Chief:

Will you please inform me if Brigadier General W. L. Elliott can be sent here to command in Minnesota? I have written you fully on the subject by mail to-day.

JOHN POPE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF ARKANSAS,

Little Rock, June 2, 1865. (Received 3rd.)

Major-General POPE:

General Sheridan has called upon me for 5,000 troops. The Third U. S. Cavalry cannot be spared. The officers think they can fill the regiment here from men about to be discharged if they are authorized to do so. Can they do it? The regiment is greatly in need of a field officer. The Third Wisconsin Cavalry, dismounted, and Batteries D and E, Second Missouri Light Artillery, are ordered to Saint Louis.

J. J. REYNOLDS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF ARKANSAS,

Little Rock, June 2, 1865. (Received 3rd.)

Major-General POPE:

Have received from General Canby copy of terms of surrender of Kirby Smith's entire command, the commissioners for the Military Division of the Missouri to be appointed by yourself. Brigadier-General Dockery, C. S. Army, was here to surrender everything in Arkansas, General Fagan's departure leaving him the senior officer in Arkansas. General Dockery leaves to-morrow morning for Camden, and will collect all he can. Churchill, Quincy, and others are scattered through the State. I have directed the provost-marshal of Lakeport to parole them as they come in. At the request of General Dockery I have agreed to have commissioners at Camden, Monticello, and Washington on the 20th of June to parole all he can collect. I will appoint these officers as requested by General Canby, unless otherwise directed by you.

J. J. REYNOLDS,

Major-General.