War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0691 Chapter LX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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SIOUX CITY, May 30, 1865.

Major-General POPE,

Saint Louis:

GENERAL: You telegraph me you want me to furnish an escort to some surveyor in Northwest Nebraska. There is a company of cavalry stationed in Nebraska at Dakota, a small town five miles south of here. They have been there for a year or so, and are of no more use than they would be if stationed in Saint Louis. I don't think there is any danger of the Indians flanking me. I do hope you will give me men enough and a chance to get at the Cheyennes now in my district. I feel sure I can overtake them, and I also feel sure that any attack in another direction will fail, for they will retreat north in the direction of the Bad Lands of the Little Missouri. With supplies at Rice, I can follow them. I expect those sixteen Indians in Minnesota who murdered that family and killed one soldier have left for the land of Queen Victoria before this. I can go to the Black Hills and fight the Cheyennes, and then march to Rice. It is a very bad country to march over, but I will do it if you say so.

With much respect, your obedient servant,

ALF. SULLY,

Brevet Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSOURI,

May 30, 1865-1. 57 p. m.

Bvt. Major General A. SULLY,

Sioux City, Iowa:

Are the Indians congregated at Black Hills there for peace or fight?

JOS. McC. BELL,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WASHINGTON, May 31, 1865-10 a. m.

General SHERIDAN,

New Orleans:

(Care of General Canby.)

The Fourth Corps has been ordered to New Orleans. There may be a few day's delay in starting, as it is desirable that they should be paid before starting. I send but eight teams and two ambulance teams to each 1,000 men. If you want more sent let me know.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF WEST MISSISSIPPI,

New Orleans, May 31, 1865. (Received June 6.)

Lieutenant-General GRANT,

Commanding U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

Your telegram of the 27th was received on the 29th, and orders were at once telegraphed to General Steele, but were delayed by the bad working of the telegraph lines. He sails to-morrow morning. I will go over to Mobile to-night to see him before be leaves. I shall give him only general instructions with regard to the occupation of the country, supposing General Sheridan's orders will reach him soon after