War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0690 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LX.

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dealings. This will be required, and any officer so lost to the respect he should entertain for himself and his fellows as to violate this injunction will be promptly dealt with to the full extent of my power.

P. EDW. CONNOR,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding District.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE PLAINS,

Julesburg, Colo. Ter., May 30, 1865.

Colonel C. H. McNALLY,

Commanding Camp Rankin:

SIR: The Sweetwater and Pole Creek routes are seriously annoyed by bands of hostile Indians, and the general commanding, having in view the safety of emigrants and freighters, directs that no more trains of emigrants, freighters, or other parties no in Government employ will be permitted to cross the river at this point with a view of traveling west by either of said routes. They will be required to trave west on the Overland Mail road. You will make it your duty to observe that this rule is obeyed in every particular. Orders have been issued to East and South Sub-District commanders to organize trains at Kearny and Junction, not less than 100 wagons each. It has been observed that in passing these headquarters they are scattered and broken up. You will detain such trains, and require them to adhere to the organization effected at either of the above-mentioned points.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. F. PRICE,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS EAST SUB-DISTRICT OF THE PLAINS,

Fort Kearny, NEBR. Ter., May 30, 1865.

Captain GEORGE F. PRICE,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, Dist. of the Plains, Julesburg, COLO. Ter.:

CAPTAIN: I must have more cavalry, It will be impossible for me to pursue Indians with my forces distributed in detachments of from four to ten men ten and fifteen miles apart along the road. I look for serious trouble in June, probably by the full of the present moon, and should the Indians come on the road in any force mu portion of the line will be in a very awkward position to receive or pursue them, scattered as all my available men are. Please lay this matter before the general commanding for his consideration.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. R. LIVINGSTON,

Colonel First Nebraska Veteran Cavalry, Commanding Sub-District.

VIRGINIA CITY, May 30, 1865.

(Received 3. 20 p. m. June 13.)

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I have just received reliable information of serious Indian difficulties near Fort Benton. Ten men were massacred 25th instant by the bloods [and] Blackfeet. The danger to emigration now en route up the Missouri River is imminent. Am fitting out an expedition of 500 militia. We need troops; can you let us have two regiments? Rations, &c., are so high here that supplies should be sent up the river forthwith.

SIDNEY EDGERTON.