War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0685 Chapter LX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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to fight him; and if the direction you indicate for General Sully to go leaves these Indians he mentions for me to deal with? Connor will get off in time. I want to get more troops to him, if possible, before he starts, so that there shall be no mistake, not only of catching the Indians, but that our overland route is beyond doubt secure. The Indians appear to be scattered all along the route in small parties from Columbus, Nebr. Ter., to Green River, and we are striking them every day. We do not find any larger bodies as yet, not to exceed 500.

G. M. DODGE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSOURI,

May 30, 1865-1. 57 p. m.

Major General G. M. DODGE,

Fort Leavenworth, Kans.:

Have inquired of General Sully as to the intentions of Indians congregated at Black Hills.

JOS. McC. BELL,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

KANSAS CITY, May 30, 1865.

(Received 7. 30 p. m.)

Major-General POPE:

Officer in command of detachment near mouth of Little Arkansas sends report that Texans and rebel Indians attacked the Wichita Indian camp, friendly to United States, and captured it. This camp is in South-west Kansas. The party were said to be strong and making toward Arkansas River.

G. M. DODGE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, Mo., May 30, 1865.

Honorable THOMAS C. FLETCHER,

Governor State of Missouri:

GOVERNOR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your dispatch asking that Colonel Hoarding be ordered to assist you in enforcing the laws. I do not quite understand your wishes. Colonel Harding, as well as all other officers in the Department of the Missouri, has orders to respond to all proper requisitions from civil officers to aid in the enforcement of civil law, in accordance with the law and the custom in times past. He, of course, stands ready to perform this duty. By giving orders to him in strict accordance with your telegram, I would be simply placing him and his troops under your command. of course you cannot mean this, nor could I give such orders with any sort of propriety. I do not know the particular service you desire him to perform,, nor the circumstances which necessitate any action on his part. Your State militia, being under your own control, I should suppose abundantly able to secure the execution to the civil posse, a report of the facts and a requisition upon General Dodge or myself will be sufficient to supply what additional aid is needed. I need not tell you, Governor, because