War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0636 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LX.

Search Civil War Official Records

and detachment will be made out and signed by the commanding officer and approved by yourself, both of which will be retained by the provost-marshal. The provost-marshal will be provided with all proper blanks. Public arms will be turned over to the officer sent from here; private arms, &c., will be retained by the men among them.

Hoping that this action may result in peace, quiet, and prosperity of the border of two States that were formerly proud of each other, I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN B. SANBORN,

Brevet Major-General, Commanding.

FORT GIBSON, May 27, 1865.

Major-General POPE:

Water low; river not navigable to this point. No troops have arrived from below except the Second and Fourteenth Kansas, about 1,200 in all. I have not yet heard of any other troops on the way. Indians are to be mustered out on the 31st. Have no horses yet, and have heard of none en route here.

JAS. G. BLUNT,

Major-General.

FORT GIBSON, May 27, 1865.

Major-General POPE:

Have there been any changes in the boundaries of the District of South Kansas? While at Fort Smith on the 6th instant I telegraphed Colonel Blair to order the Fifteenth Kansas and First Colorado Battery to report to me at this place (Fort Gibson). Colonel Blair informs me that he was notified by General Mitchell and General Dodge to move no troops without orders from them. I have no information that there have been any changes of boundaries in my command, and do not understand why my orders should be interfered with by General Mitchell and General Dodge.

JAS. G. BLUNT,

Major-General.

TEMPORARY OFFICE CREEK AGENCY,

Fort Gibson, C. M., May 27, 1865.

Major General J. G. BLUNT,

Commanding District of South Kansas, Fort Gibson, C. N.:

GENERAL: From Indian scouts recently come in from the west, and also from parties coming from Kansas, I learn that large numbers of cattle are being driven from the Creek country, and from the Indian county on the south into Kansas. Large droves of cattle have been taken north within the last twenty days. I also learn from a letter of the Indians from a friend in Kansas persons are said to be representing that they have written authority from the chiefs, superintendent, agents, and military authorities to drive out cattle from the Indian country. No such has been delegated by the Creek Nation to any one. About a year ago a Mr. Parkinson was appointed by them as agent to sell any stock that they might drive in hee, prove a clear title to before the provost-marshal of this post, and wish so to dispose of, he to turn to the owners the moneys accruing from any such sale, and they to allow him so much per day for his trouble. Nothing was ever