War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0629 Chapter LX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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the persuasion that the propriety of it and the purposes indicated will be apparent to all, whatever differences of opinion have heretofore existed among our people.

Your obedient servant,

H. FLANAGIN.

[Inclosure B.]

EXECUTIVE OFFICE,

Washington Ark., May 22, 1865.

Mr. A. H. GARLAND:

DEAR SIR: Inclosed herewith find authority to go to Little Rock to consult with the military and civil authorities at Little Rock. You will find also a copy of letter which was addressed to Judge Clendenin, who is now supposed to be at Little Rock. No great difficulty will probably be experienced in having a convention should one be desired. The same clerks might be commissioned by both Governments. I should have no hesitancy in appointing such as exercise the duties under the administration of Governor Murphy, and it is supposed he might no objection to commission those who exercise the duties under this Government. There has been elections for clerks in almost all the counties south of the Arkansas River, and in serval of those north. The importance of the measures suggested in order to secure quiet and prosperity can scarcely be overrated and it seems to me that all must see them in the same light, if they can disabuse their minds of suspicion that private advantage is sought, and with this view you can safety say that I fill the position in which I now act without solicitation, and that I shall not be a candidate under any state of case for re-election. You are authorized to say to General Reynolds that I shall not leave Arkansas, and that if the or the President shall so direct I will report at Little Rock.

Your obedient servant,

H. FLANAGIN.

[Inclosure C.]

EXECUTIVE OFFICE,

Washington, Ark., May 19, 1865.

Honorable J. J. CLENDENIN:

DEAR SIR: Understanding that you are about leaving this section, I venture to address you upon the subject of State affairs and to inform you of my future policy under certain contingencies. You are aware that Governor Allen has been deputed by General Smith to have interview with the Federal authorities with a view to an ultimate surrender of the military forces of the department. This was done with my knowledge and consent, and, of course, must for present be treated by me as an act by which I am in honor bound. Should the interview result in nothing being done my policy will be to restore quiet to the country at the earliest possible day, and if circumstances indicate that I can be of use no personal danger to myself will prevent my remaining. The greatest danger to the quiet and safety of the country (as I suppose) will be from guerrilla bands, who may be recruited and held together under the pretense that are defending a valid State government which did represent a large majority of the people. We shall have many men who will be unfitted for the peaceful advocations of life, and whose morals will not restrain them from violence. An excuse to enlist such will in all probability be used, and although they cannot be troublesome to the United States Government, they can't destroy the less settled parts of the country unless prevented by all judicious means. In