War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0564 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LX.

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wagon trails and its animals are unfit for a campaign, as they were when they were turned over to my quartermaster. A few days will be needed to fit the pontoon train and bridge for the field. Some of the boats need calking and pitching badly. They will, of course, be attended to. A more complete report will be forwarded as early as practicable.

I remain, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BAILEY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES,

Brazos Santiago, Tex., May 23, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel J. SCHUYLER CROSBY,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, Department of the Gulf, New Orleans:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that this command has not received issues of fresh meat for the past twenty days; that all the cattle on Padre Island have been collected and slaughtered. The lines have been so contracted that access to the country has been impossible. There are but twenty horses fit for any kind of service. Under these circumstances I respectfully urge the importance and necessity of increasing the forces by one battery of artillery and one regiment of cavalry. An additional force so as to occupy Brownsville, and thus intercept the contraband trade now being carried on between Texas and Matamoras, is required. Horses to mount about 300 men, Second Texas Cavalry, are also very necessary.

I am, very truly, your obedient servant,

E. B. BROWN,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES,

Brazos Santiago, Tex., May 23, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel J. SCHUYLER CROSBY,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, Department of the Gulf, New Orleans:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report for the information of the major-general commanding that by the return of a flag of truce from Brownsville I have learned the following, which I deem reliable: The forces of the enemy on the Rio Grande in the vicinity of Brownsville number about 1,000 men, with six pieces of light artillery. Brigadier-General Slaughter, who is in command, is an ally of the Imperial Government of Mexico, but he has but few supporters. Colonel Ford, second in command, with a very large majority of the troops favors the Liberal Government of Juarez, and expects to join the loyal people of the United States in any movement that may be made to overthrow the power of the French in that State. Re-enforcements have arrived at Matamoras and defensive works are being constructed there. It is rumored that the Imperial force is to be increased to 14,000 men. This, however, is not authentic. The large proportion of the troops at Brownsville are anxious for peace and earnestly opposed to any further resistance. With a few exceptions they will join in an effort to restore quiet and peace to the country. This party is headed by Colonel Ford. General Slaughter, with a few adherents, seems disposed to continue the contest as long as possible. The property of the Confederate Gov-