War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0522 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LX.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, May 20, 1865-3. 05 p. m.

Major-General POPE:

Elm Creek is between Fort Kearny and the Blue. Three stations were attacked. Don't know how many Indians there were, or what they belonged to. I judge small roving bands.

G. M. DODGE,

Major-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 245.

Washington, May 20, 1865.

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11. Brigadier General J. A. Williamson, U. S. Volunteers, will report to the commanding general Department of the Missouri for assignment to duty.

By command of Lieutenant-General Grant;

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

May 20, 1865-10. 20 a. m.

Governor FLETCHER, Jefferson City:

They can retain the horses after properly receipting for them to the nearest U. S. quartermaster.

G. M. DODGE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Rolla, Mo., May 20, 1865.

Major J. W. BARNES,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Guerrillas are becoming numerous in Howell and Oregon Counties. I shall send a strong scout in that direction, [if] the remaining four companies of the Thirteenth Missouri Cavalry are not relived within the next five or six days.

JOHN MORRILL,

Colonel, Commanding.

SPRINGFIELD, May 20, 1865.

Major-General DODGE:

Orders from the Secretary of War, received by assistant commissary of musters through Colonel Bonneville, direct the muster out of the recruits of the Sixth and Eighth Cavalry Missouri State Militia. This will take out of the service 400 of the most reliable troops I have, and make it absolutely necessary for more troops to be sent here. Otherwise I shall have to draw all the troops into our chief towns and main lines of communication, and there is danger that the country will be overrun by bushwhackers and citizens driven out. Up to yesterday morning the band of forty-six had evaded the troops by scattering all through the woods when approached, and then coming together again at some remote point. The troops are still hunting them in the Niangua Hills.

JOHN B. SANBORN,

Brigadier-General.