War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0520 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LX.

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[Inclosure.]

VICKSBURG, MISS., May 20, 1865.

(Received 1. 30 a. m. 24th.)

ADJUTANT-GENERAL U. S. ARMY:

I respectfully tender my resignation as major-general of volunteers, and request a leave of absence of thirty days as major of engineers, to enable me to attend to my private affairs. The position of my command, the breaking up of the Confederate Government, and consequent reduction of our forces, will prevent the slightest objection being raised to the acceptance of my resignation. In addition I have to say that from constant exertion in the field since the beginning of the rebellion, I have become much exhausted, and feel unable to properly continue on duty in this hot and debilitating climate without some relaxation.

G. K. WARREN,

Major of Engineer and Major-General.

[Indorsement.]

HDQRS. ARMY AND DIVISION OF WEST MISSISSIPPI,

Mobile, May 20, 1865.

Approved and respectfully forwarded.

E. R. S. CANBY,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. ARMY AND DIVISION OF WEST MISSISSIPPI,

Mobile, Ala., May 20, 1865.

Major-General WARREN,

Commanding Department of Mississippi, Vicksburg, Miss.:

By direction of the President, you will not recognize any officer of the Confederate or State governments within the limits of your command as authorized to exercise in any manner whatever the functions of their late officers. You will prevent, by force, if necessary, any attempt on the part of the Legislature of any of the States in insurrection to assemble for legislative purposes, and you will arrest and imprison any members or other persons who may attempt to exercise these functions in opposition to your orders, reporting your action through these headquarters for the information of the President. The civil officers capitulation of the military forces, but in notifying them that military commanders have no authority to entertain any question touching political relations of the seceded States to the general Government, or the status of citizens, I have advised them to return to their posts, taking with them the archives and other property in their charge, and to report to the military authorities, to await the action of the Government in their cases. when this is done in good faith, you can allow them to remain at their homes without molestation by the military authorities, so long as they conduct themselves with propriety and there is no attempt to evade the legal responsibilities they have incurred. This of course does not include the high officers of the Confederate or State governments. It is of great importance to the Government and to the people that all judicial, land and other records affecting the title to property and other private interests should be secured and preserved, and you will spare no exertions to get possession of them.

E. R. S. CANBY,

Major-General, Commanding.