War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0510 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LX.

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think we shall receive them, and if civil courts want to prosecute them, let them do so, the military authorities receiving their surrender the same as in Kentucky and Tennessee, which does not guarantee against civil prosecution for any act they may have committed. If the bands that propose to give up do so, it will do a great deal to establish peace and quite in the State. The Fifteenth Kansas, on the border, has been removed, and the Seventeenth Illinois is on their way up there to look after that section of country. They will operate in Vernon, Cass, Bates, and Jackson Counties, and keep those thieves out.

G. M. DODGE,

Major-General.

CAPE GIRARDEAU, May 19, 1865.

Major HANNAHS,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General:

I have ordered one company of the Seventh Kansas Cavalry to Farmington and one company to Fredericktown, with instructions to divide up their commands in detachments and scour the country and rid it of those thieves.

F. M. MALONE,

Lieutenant-Colonel.

HEADQUARTERS POST LICKING, TEXAS COUNTY, MO.,

Licking, Mo., May 19, 1865.

Colonel MORRILL,

Commanding District of Rolla, Mo.:

COLONEL: I have the honor to state that the bushwhackers rob and plunder every wagon that passes through Howell and Fulton Counties near the line. Said guerrillas consort and harbor in said locality of country. I think it would be a wise plan to move down with a scout and clean them out, for which I would like to obtain permission from you to move out in person in charge of a scout for that purpose.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM MONKS,

Captain Company K, Sixteenth Cavalry Missouri Vols., Commanding Post.

WARRENSBURG, May 19, 1865-2. 40 p. m.

General DODGE:

In two hours I shall leave here to see what the surrender of bushwhackers means. Captain Laurant will attend to business in my absence.

CHESTER HARDING, JR.,

Colonel, &c.

WARRENSBURG, May 19, 1865.

Colonel J. G. CLARK,

Jefferson City:

Deserters from the rebel army who deliver themselves up will be required to take the oath prescribed in the President's proclamation of December 8, 1863. One copy of the oath will be delivered to the deserters and one copy forwarded to the provost-marshal-general of