War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0489 Chapter LX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

Maybery is prowling about in the vicinity. His force is estimated at 300 men. They are encamped between the Arkansas and White Rivers and are doing some damage to citizens.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRANK N. WICKER,

Lieutenant, Signal Corps, U. S. Army.

(In the absence of Captain S. M. Eaton, chief signal officer, Military Division of West Mississippi.)

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. MIL. DIV. OF WEST MISSISSIPPI, Numbers 134.

New Orleans, La., May 18, 1865.

* * * * *

4. Colonel William McE. Dye, Twentieth Iowa Infantry, is hereby appointed agent for exchange of prisoners of war for this military division. Captain W. H. Sterling, First. U. S. Infantry, is relieved from duty as agent of exchange, and will turn over to Colonel Dye all books and papers of his office, after which he will report to the commanding officer of his regiment for duty.

* * * * *

By order of Major General E. R. S. Canby:

C. H. DYER,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. SOUTHERN DIV. OF LOUISIANA, Numbers 161.

New Orleans, May 18, 1865.

1. By directions from headquarters Department of the Gulf, the Eighty-first U. S. Colored Infantry will relieve the Eightieth U. S. Colored Infantry in the city of New Orleans. The Eighty-first will at once march to New Orleans, and on relieving the Eightieth the latter will march to Camp Parapet and report to the commanding officer of that post. This order will go into effect on the 19th instant. The quartermaster's department will furnish transportation for the baggage of these regiments.

* * * * *

By order of Brigadier-General Sherman:

WICKHAM HOFFMAN,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF LA FOURCHE,

Brashear City, La., May 18, 1865.

Major W. HOFFMAN,

Asst. Adjt. General, Southern Div. of Louisiana, New Orleans:

The water rose two inches in the last twenty-four hours. We are constantly at work building and strengthening our levees, with full faith of being able to resist the flood. Last night the levee was cut between the camp of the Ninety-eighth [U. S. Colored Troops] and Twenty-fifth New York Battery-it is supposed by some citizen, many of whom are foolish enough to believe that our leveeing in a small spot of ground works the water higher on them. The rush of water was heard by some soldiers, and alarm given, and the break stopped before much damage was done. I have ordered a heavy guard on the levee at night in future. I found on conversing with the captain, who had been taken away from Tiger-