War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0478 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LX.

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HEADQUARTERS SOUTHERN DIVISION OF LOUISIANA,

New Orleans, La., May 17, 1865.

Brigadier-General CAMERON,

Commanding La Fourche District, Brashear City, La.:

Brigadier-General Sherman directs me to inform you that you can retain the Camargo at Brasher if you want her.

WICKHAM HOFFMAN,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS SOUTHERN DIVISION OF LOUISIANA,

New Orleans, La., May 17, 1865.

Brigadier-General CAMERON,

Brashear City, La.:

GENERAL: From your report it appears that the water continues to rise from one to two inches daily, and that it has to rise but about fourteen inches more to cover the whole ground in and around the works. It is for you to judge where there is so strong a probability of having to abandon the position as to render it necessary to commence moving the public property. The thing must be so managed that nothing may be lost. The steamer Bart Able will be there soon. She is of great capacity. Retain her there for this purpose, and the moment it becomes apparent that the place must be abandoned telegraph and let us know what more transportation is requisite. Acknowledge receipt.

By order of Brigadier-General Sherman:

WICKHAM HOFFMAN,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF LA FOURCHE,

Brashear City, La., May 17, 1865.

Major W. HOFFMAN,

Asst. Adjt. General, Southern Div. of Louisiana, New Orleans:

Your telegram permitting me to retain the Camargo is just received, but she had gone and was out of sight. I will retain the Bart Able for an emergency, and in the meanwhile she can be used as a wood-boat and to relieve drowning families while the Cornie is engaged in carrying the mail to Tigerville and back. The water, to be on a leave with the highest part of the ground here, must rise some fifteen inches yet. I believe we can keep it out safely with our levee if it rises yet thirty inches. That is within three inches of being as high as the water river was known since the occupation of the country by white men. If the water rises higher than that we may keep it out for a rise of six inches more, but it could not be considered certain until tested. My opinion is that the water will not rise thirty inches more and that consequently we shall not be driven to the necessity of an evacuation. If the water should make a further rise of thirty-six inches and break our levees we could not then, of course, evacuate without great difficulty and some loss. My belief, however, is, as I said before, that we shall be able to protect ourselves, but in a contest with the elements we may be disappointed.

Yours,

R. A. CAMERON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding District.