War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0477 Chapter LX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF WEST MISSISSIPPI, OFFICE OF CHIEF SIGNAL OFFICER,

New Orleans, La., May 17, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel C. T. CHRISTENSEN,

Asst. Adjt. General, Military Division of West Mississippi:

COLONEL: I have the honor to state that no information of importance from the enemy's lines has reached this office to-day.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRANK N. WICKER,

Lieutenant, Signal Corps, U. S. Army.

(In the absence of Captain S. M. Eaton, chief signal officer, Military Division of West Mississippi.)

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF WEST MISSISSIPPI, OFFICE OF CHIEF SIGNAL OFFICER,

New Orleans, La., May 17, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel C. T. CHRISTENSEN,

Asst. Adjt. General, Military Division of West Mississippi:

COLONEL: I have the honor to submit to your consideration the following extra report of information received at this office this 17th day of May, 1865: Lieutenant Curtiss reports by letter from Baton Rouge, May 12, 1865, that it is currently reported outside that Jeff. Davis has succeeded in crossing the Mississippi River, taking with him his treasure. Also that large numbers are crossing from the east side of the river to avid being surrendered by General Taylor. They cross at various points, employing negroes and citizens (detailed from the rebel army for that purpose) to cross them.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRANK N. WICKER,

Lieutenant, Signal Corps, U. S. Army.

(In absence of Captain S. M. Eaton, chief signal officer, Military Division of West Mississippi.)

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF LA FOURCHE,

Brashear City, La., May 17, 1865.

Major W. HOFFMAN,

Asst. Adjt. General, Southern Div. of Louisiana, New Orleans:

The water rose about an inch and a half during the last twenty-four hours. The steamer Camargo arrived from New Orleans last evening and will leave to day. On account of the water at Bayou Louis and the deficiency of supplying the company there, I have moved them to Bayou Boeuf, where there is a little dry land. The company at Catahoula and the two companies at Tigerville, having no dry land to camp on and being crowded in houses, which rendered them very uncomfortable, I have moved here. The man sent with the mail by hand-car day before yesterday to Terre Bonne, arrived there late that night and started to return to this place yesterday morning, but up to this time he has hot been hard from. I shall send the Cornie up to Tigerville to-day, and from that place send the mail through in a small boat. After having one trip made I can tell how practicable that route will be. My greatest fear of that route is from parties of rebels who can intercept the messenger by small boats anywhere in the swamp.

R. A. CAMERON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding District.