War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0471 Chapter LX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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Jefferson City and establish your headquarters at that place, taking with you all mail matter and records now at Booneville. You will receive your order at Jefferson City. Telegraph when you expect to leave. Where is Lieutenant-Colonel Bryant?

By order of Colonel Harding:

C. G. LAURANT,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHWEST MISSOURI,

Springfield, Mo., May 16, 1865.

Major JAMES M. MOORE,

Commanding at Cassville:

All officers who surrender and will take a parole not to take up or bear arms against the United States until duty exchanged will be allowed to retain their side-arms and other private property and to go to their homes if in a State that has been in rebellion. Enlisted men who are thus paroled will be allowed the same privileges, except as to retaining arms. Officers below the rank of colonel, and all men who take the oath of amnesty, will be entitled to go where they please, and are restored to all their civil rights and to their property. Officers and men who desire to surrender and take the oath of amnesty can do so at Cassville. All who choose simply to take a parole not to bear arms again against the United States until duly exchanged will be sent to this place, as duplicate rolls have to be made out and signed by the officer who surrenders his men and each man furnished with a copy of his parole. Furnish full protection to all who surrender.

JOHN B. SANBORN,

Brevet Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHWEST MISSOURI,

Springfield, Mo., May 16, 1865.

Lieutenant-Colonel CHNABLE, C. S. Army,

Yellville, Ark.:

COLONEL: Your communications of the 12th instant came duly to hand. All robbing, burning, and killing of citizens and Confederate soldiers after capture on the border has been done, if at all, without any orders, authority, or countenance from me or through me. All soldiers captured in that vicinity, so far as reported and my knowledge goes, have been brought to this place and treated as prisoners of war and forwarded to Saint Louis.

I have had a court of inquiry to examine into the conduct of officers, soldiers, and citizens who have been in that country, toward the citizens there and their property, and seized a large amount of property that from the report I had reason to believe was taken without proper compensation. The fact that small bands of marauders have at times come into this section of Missouri and stolen property, and in some instances killed citizens, had produced in the minds of some citizens here, and doubtless with some soldiers, strong feelings of revenge, and I have no doubt that at times citizens, without any notice to any one, enter that section to gratify this feeling, and it may be that officers in command of scouting parties do not restrain their men as much as they should, but [I] have not heard of any such neglect. My desire is to do