War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0370 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LX.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

May 9, 1865-10. 10 a. m.

Colonel HARDING,

Warrensburg:

Give such instructions to companies at Jefferson City and below as will secure all the rafts and skiffs on the river, in accordance with my order.

G. M. DODGE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

May 9, 1865-10. 10 p. m.

Colonel HARDING,

Warrensburg:

The six companies from Rolla cannot report to you; they are sent of to sweep the Osage. I must keep the in striking distance of Rolla district.

G. M. DODGE,

Major-General.

WARRENSBURG, MO., May 9, 1865.

Colonel CHESTER HARDING, Jr., or

Captain C. G. LAURANT:

DEAR SIR: If it is the purpose to place the troops on line of road that are on their way up on train, it would be letter to let 100 stay with the train that is laying iron. We have a large amount of supplies on this train. Also 100 at Holden, 100 at Kingsville, 150 at Duncan's Branch, and so on to Pleasant Hill. Infantry are better for this purpose than cavalry. I think with this arrangement we could go on with the work rapidly. Pardon me, sir, for the liberty I take in suggesting this to you, but if I do not get protection for our workmen, and that soon, we will lose them all.

Yours, respectfully,

D. R. GARRISON,

Vice-President Pacific Railroad and Supt. of Construction.

LEXINGTON, MO., May 9, 1865.

Colonel HARDING:

Clement, commanding Anderson's guerrillas, was on the Columbus road ten miles out last night. He sent me a letter this morning making threats of retaliation if his friends were hurt, and that he would treat all men who were reported for militia duty as public enemies. He has divided his command of over 100 men int two parties. One had gone east. Cy. Porter was fourteen miles out on the Salt Pond road. He has over 100 men. He was with Clement and Anderson at Holden, but his men claim to have no part in the outrage committed there. From all reports, and I am glad to say they are plenty, there are over 200 bushwhackers in the country. I have not a mounted available man here, except those men from Wyckoff. Before I knew of this increase I had sent them out in parties so small that there is danger of their being taken in detail. I would earnestly urge the necessity of at once sending