War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0241 Chapter LX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF WEST TENNESSEE,

Memphis, Tenn., April 29, 1865.

Major General N. J. T. DANA,

Commanding Department of Mississippi:

GENERAL: In view of the probable fact that Jeff. Davis will attempt to cross the Mississippi between Vicksburg and New Orleans, I send you the Third U. S. colored Cavalry, under Brevet Brigadier-General Osband. By reason of the overflowed condition of the country from Vicksburg to this point, it seems rather improbable that he will attempt to cross above Vicksburg, though it would not be strange if he should run out of the Yazoo, as he could easily seize one or all the numerous trading boats up there for that purpose. It looks to me as though the most likely point of crossing would be between Vicksburg and Natchez, probably in the neighborhood of Rodney.

C. C. WASHBURN,

Major-General.

P. S. - The steamer John Raine, which will take these troops down, I wish you would order back as soon as possible, as she is much wanted here.

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSOURI,

April 29, 1865 - 5. 25 p. m.

I have sent you 1,500 horses and will send 500 more to-morrow. Many small parties are crossing the Arkansas and coming up into Missouri. Your cavalry should be kept constantly employed to intercept such parties. Let me hear by telegraph as soon as you hear from Fagan or Jeff. Thompson.

JOHN POPE,

Major-General.

ENGINEER'S OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF ARKANSAS,

Little Rock, Ark., April 29, 1865.

Major General J. J. REYNOLDS,

Commanding Department of Arkansas:

GENERAL: The portion of the State of Arkansas which lies south of the Arkansas River and is traversed by the roads numbered 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, in my letter to you dated April 8, is well known as a mountainous and rugged region. The ranges known as the Poteau, Washita, Cassotot, Magazine, Petit Jean, Fourche la Fave, and Caddo Mountains are found in this section and are crossed by one or more of the roads named. There are cross-roads, by means of which empty or lightly loaded wagons can pass from one road to the other. One of these roads leaves Danville, follows up Dutch Creek, and joins the Fort Smith road at Waldron. It has been used by our scouting parties. Another, leaving the Mount Ida road a few miles south of Danville, follows the Fourche La Fave Creek and joins the Fort Smith road near the Washita Mountains and about fifteen mils south of Waldron. Dallas, known on some maps as Panther, and Caddo Gap, a point about twelve miles southeast of Caddo Cover, appear to be the principal points at and near which trains pass through the Cassatot and Caddo Mountains. After crossing these mountains, going south, the elevation of the coun-

16 R R VOL XLVIII, PT II