War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0168 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LX.

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HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF WEST MISSISSIPPI,

OFFICE OF CHIEF SIGNAL, OFFICER,

New Orleans, La., April 24, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel C. T. CHRISTENSEN,

Asst. Adjt. General, Military Division of West Mississippi:

COLONEL: I have the honor to submit to you consideration the following report of information received at this office this 24th day of April, 1865: Lieutenant O. L. Walker reports from Brazors Santiago, April 6, that General Slaughter has moved his headquarters to Corpus Christi, but a small force still remained in Brownsville. A deserter from the Army of Northern Virginia, who spent about two weeks between Jackson, Miss., and our lines, states that there was not even a provost guard along the New Orleans and Jackson Railroad, as he was not required to show his papers in passing twice over the road. The only troops in the State of Mississippi are those engaged in hunting deserters and conscripts, and some of the State Reserves (old men armed with shotguns) about Osyka and Camp Moore. Colonel Terry, of the old Seventh Louisiana Infantry, is stationed at Amite City, in charge of hunting deserters in that section. Some private parties have built a small engine to run between Osyka, Miss., and Ponchatoula River. There are no cars on this part of the route except hand-cars. The people are expecting the early opening of the road from Jackson to New Orleans. It is represented that the general feeling amount the people of Mississippi is that the State is conquered, and the sooner it is occupied by our troops the better. The inhabitants are most of them ready to assist in secreting deserters and refugees, contrary to the most stringent orders to report them. The negroes whom the rebels are conscripting say if they must fight they want to fight for their own side the Union. Mrs. Whitley, from Vicksburg, reports that even Confederate officers and soldiers pass in out of the lines at that post; that she stopped in the same with some men of the Washington Artillery from Virginia. They said that the rebels would hold out west of the Mississippi, and would transfer all the men they possibly could from the east to the west side. She also confirms the report of the wounding of Forrest in the late fight near Selma. He was wounded in the arm. General Hodge was relieved of the command of the District of Mississippi and East Louisiana about the 15th instant. The name of the officer relieving him is not known.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. M. JACKSON,

Major, Tenth U. S. Colored Heavy Artillery.

(In absence of Captain S. M. Eaton, chief signal officer, Military Division of West Mississippi.)

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. MIL. DIV. OF WEST MISSISSIPPI, Numbers 113.

New Orleans, La., April 24, 1865.

1. Major Albert Ruttakay, First Florida Cavalry, will report to Major General N. P. Banks, commanding Department of the Gulf, for assignment to duty on his staff.

By order of Major General E. R. S. Canby:

C. H. DYER,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.