War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0136 Chapter LX. LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI.

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HDQRS. THIRD Brigadier, THIRD DIV., 7TH ARMY CORPS,

Fort Gibson, C. N., April 19, 1865.

Major General J. J. REYNOLDS,

Commanding Department of Arkansas, Little Rock, Ark.:

SIR: As requested or you, I advise you of condition of affairs here. I believe enough corn has been planted to secure the loyal Indian refugees from starvation, or the contractors, next year, if we have a season. I allowed a large number of soldiers to go and assist the women and children in fencing and putting in corn. The seed corn was of great advantage. A large amount has been planted. The furloughed soldiers are returning promptly at the expiration of the short term allowed. We have regimental gardens and are making Government farm. All is still quiet in front. I communicated the news of the enemy I had to General Bussey, which I suppose he has forwarded. I have yet learned nothing further in reference to the question of muster out or reorganization.

Very respectfully,

WM. A. PHILLIPS,

Colonel, Commanding.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF WEST MISSISSIPPI,

OFFICE OF CHIEF SIGNAL OFFICER,

New Orleans, La., April 20, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel C. T. CHRISTENSEN,

Asst. Adjt. General, Military Division of West Mississippi:

COLONEL: I have the honor to submit to your consideration the following report of information received at this office this 20th day of April, 1865: Major Webster reports from Pass Manchac that he is unable to ascertain the place at which Colonels Powers and Griffith were to cross the Mississippi, but considers the information that they are ordered across reliable. He is also informed through the same source that Colonel Gober's regiment is to be stationed at Amite City. It is reported that Forrest was wounded in a fight with our cavalry near Selma. Three deserters from the rebel ordnance depot at Macon, Ga., state that the facilities for manufacturing all the materials of war are very extensive, including a very large laboratory. Without Macon and Augusta itible for the rebels to supply their armies.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. M. JACKSON,

Major, Tenth U. S. Colored Heavy Artillery.

(In absence of Captain S. M. Eaton, chief signal officer, Military Division of West Mississippi.)

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF PORT HUDSON, Numbers 12. Port Hudson, La., April 20, 1865.

Without profound sorrow the brigadier-general commanding announces the death of Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States of America, at Washington, the capital of our nation, on Friday, 14th instant, at 7,22 a. m., having been assassinated by Wilkes Booth. * In all the calamities that have ever befallen our country this is the most horrifying that the American people have been called upon to deplore.

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* The President died on Saturday morning, April 15.

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