War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0080 Chapter LX. LOUISIANA AND TRANS-MISSISSIPPI.

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[First indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF ARKANSAS,

Lewisville, February 17, 1865.

Respectfully forwarded to Major-General Magruder, at Shreveport, La., for his information and necessary action.

ED. P. TURNER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Second indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF ARKANSAS,

Lewisville, Ark., March 6, 1865.

Respectfully referred to Brigadier General M. Jeff. Thompson, commanding Northern Sub-District of Arkansas, who will take such measures as he may deem necessary to have the perpetrators of these outrages brought to justice. He will communicate with the Federal commander at Clarksville and demand the men who are guilty of such inhuman outrages.

By command of Major-General Magruder:

M. M. KIMMEL,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Third indorsement.]

HDQRS. NORTHERN SUB-DISTRICT OF ARKANSAS,

Harrisburg, April 12, 1865.

Respectfully forwarded to the commanding officer of the Federal forces in Arkansas at Little Rock, with a request that he either punish these fiends or turn them over to the C. S. military authorities for punishment.

M. JEFF. THOMPSON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, Mo., April 12, 1865.

Honorable T. C. FLETCHER,

Governor of Missouri:

DEAR SIR: From the reports of General Fisk and other responsible persons, everything seems ready for resumption of civil administration in North Missouri, except probably the counties immediately along the river. I propose, quietly and without any published orders, to withdraw all provost-marshals in that region and gradually concentrate all the troops in the river counties. I prefer, with your acquiescence, to allow the whole administration in North Missouri to drift quietly into the hands of the civil authorities, without public notice, so that some day, before long, the people will find everything in their own hands, without being aware of the process. We ought to make a beginning immediately. The example, even of one county, would lead to rapid and complete results. The surrender of Lee's army, foreshadowing an immediate end to the rebellion, disarms all opposition to our policy even in this city. The arguments used by Strong and Drake against such a policy so long as the rebellion was still alive and in force have lost their value. Now seems to me the time to strike. Be the first in this reconstruction.