War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0067 Chapter LX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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law can be safely abrogated in North Missouri. The courts are discharging their proper functions in every county in my district. The local military organizations will be effective in the suppression of lawlessness, and I doubt not but that the return to the old paths will have a most salutary effect not only upon North Missouri, but upon our entire Commonwealth. That there will be some disturbances and much lawlessness in the counties of the border cannot be doubted. It is equally true that civil authorities can as well, if not better, check such evils. The signs of the times indicate an early return of peace and unity to all the land. May God hasten its coming and give us wise, Christian, prudent statesmanship for the great work of restoration and the enjoyment of a just and lasting tranquility.

I am, sir, with great respect, your obedient servant,

CLINTON B. FISK,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, April 10, 1865.

Bvt. Brigadier General J. H. FORD,

Fort Riley:

The following dispatch form Colonel Blair, at Fort Scott, is sent for your information. You had better ascertain the strength of this force before you start west:

Captain Donovan writes me from Eureka, a hundred miles west of here, that a portion of Stand Watie's force, 600 strong, is about fifty miles south of him, at junction of Whitewater and Walnut. The force is composed of Indians and whites, and may be only the advance of a larger body. I have sent out about 250 and a howitzer, which is about all I have mounted. Will have 200 or Third Wisconsin Cavalry mounted to-morrow, and if the news is confirmed I shall take them and go out myself.

CHAS W. BLAIR,

Colonel.

We must ascertain if any force is there that Blair cannot handle; if so, you must move on them. It will not do to leave them to threaten our frontier. Referring to your dispatch of 9th, if there are any Indians who are friendly and took no part in the troubles, we want to keep them so. All others we mus punish and make them keep the peace. I have no authority to make treaties of peace. That belongs to the Indian Department.

G. M. DODGE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, April 10, 1865.

Major-General BLUNT,

Paola, or

Colonel BLAIR,

Fort Scott:

Colonel Ford, at Fort Riley, sends report of one of his scouts of force on Whitewater. Take all the troops you can raise and move out in that direction to head them off.

G. M. DODGE,

Major-General.