War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0047 Chapter LX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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DENVER, April 7, 1865-2. 10 p. m.

Major-General DODGE:

Commander of Laramie informs me that Sioux Indians have not been captured, but are living peaceably ten miles from the post. Part of their young men volunteer to fight Cheyennes. Would recommend they be left where they are until I visit Laramie.

P. E. CONNOR,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, April 7, 1865-4. 35 p. m.

Brigadier General P. E. CONNOR,

Denver:

Let the Indians remain as you suggest.

G. M. DODGE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF COLORADO, Denver, April 7, 1865.

Lieutenant GEORGE W. HAWKINS,

Commanding Co. A, Veteran Battalion, First Colorado Cavalry, Bijou Basin, Colo. Ter.:

SIR: Your communication of the 1st instant received. Should you find a more suitable place for a camp a few miles eastward of the Basin, that is, nearer to wood and grass (forage), you have permission so to move. I have understood that good grass was in that neighborhood in abundance, and that there was little or no snow in the vicinity, particularly eastward. The horses and mules must be properly cared for, and should they deteriorate you will be held responsible. While I am aware that forage is scarce, yet with the little your animals have to do and the watchful eye of the commanding officer continually on the men, they must improve. You will on receipt of this send a scout of two non-commissioned officers and ten privates, well mounted, armed, and equipped, to examine thoroughly the headwaters of the Smoky Hill and Republican streams for Indians, or signs of Indians. Should the scout strike any trail I desire it followed up until the enemy is found, his strength ascertained, and general locality. The non-commissioned officer whom you place in charge be brave and reliable, and will report in writing the result of scout as well as the entire distance traveled, which will be forwarded to these headquarters with your indorsement thereon. Stationed as you company is, away from all towns and inducements to run astray, the finest state of subordination, drill, and general discipline should exist, and anything short of this must be attributed to your carelessness and neglect of duty as an officer.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. MOONLIGHT,

Colonel Eleventh Kansas Cavalry, Commanding.