War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0035 Chapter LX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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mode of procedure, and to show the slight grounds upon which citizens have been deprived of their liberty and made the victims of this species of prosecution and rascality, I forward them with exact copies of the affidavits upon which J. C. Compton was arrested and imprisoned and finally banished from the State (see papers* marked A), together with an order* issued by the assistant provost-marshal. These papers are the only evidence on file against Mr. Compton, and the provost-marshal knew of no other evidence against him. I also forward the within statement of Mr. Compton (marked B*) taken before me, which gives a full history of the case. The case of Compton is but a fair sample. The cases of Boone, Finney, Fielding, and others are in every way similar and more or less aggravated. These parties had, during the first year of the war, been known as Southern sympathizers, but they have from the first been law-abiding citizens, and have given no material aid to the rebellion in any way, shape or from, and are as bitterly opposed to guerrillaism and kindred offenses as the most radical Union man. Some of them have aided me materially during the past year by giving important information relative to the movements of guerrillas bands. During my investigation I called in the circuit judge and laid the matter developed before him, and requested that the rascals be brought to punishment. I have since learned that two of them have been indicated by the guard jury, which was then in session. I revoked the order of banishment in the cases of Compton, Boone, Finney, Fielding, and Maupin, subject to your approval. I cannot reason to any other conclusion than that the provost-marshal, Captain G. H. Walser, is guilty of a criminal complicity in these rascalities; but whether the evidence is sufficiently clear to warrant his arrest and trial before a court-martial is somewhat questionable. Unless there is strong reasonable probability of his conviction, of course it would be impolitic to bring him to trial. Until the investigation I had every reason to believe Captain Walser an honorable and trustworthy officer, in whom I reposed full confidence.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, general, your obedient servant,

CLINTON B. FISK,

Brigadier-General.

WESTON, April 5, 1865.

Brigadier-General PENICK:

SIR: Tinsley was found dead by some people who had been to church in the Boydson neighborhood. Who killed him is not known. He is supposed to have been sent in company of King Litton and Morton Dryden, two notorious bushwhackers. I will write particulars to-morrow.

Respectfully,

A. G. BELLER.

WESTON, April 5, 1865.

Brigadier-General PENICK:

Tinsley was killed by soldiers from Saint Joseph, so says report.

H. M. MATTHEWS,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

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*Omitted.

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