War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0842 OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA. Chapter LIX.

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NEAR GREENSBOROUGH, April 26, 1865-9 a. m.

Major-General LOMAX:

Danville:

You can report here. Leave reliable officer at Danville and each telegraph office to give us information of enemy's movements. Better stay in Danville as long as prudent, as we may have to communicate through you to Federal commander this afternoon.

ARCHER ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CHARLOTTE, N. C., April 27, 1865.

General JOSEPH E. JOHNSTON,

Greensborough, N. C.:

A telegram received from Brigadier-General Jordan by Colonel Riely, of my staff, who had telegraphed, by my direction, to ascertain what had transpired from the military convention, states that it had terminated, resulting in a cessation of war by all embraced, private property respected, and transportation home given. I was left here within the territorial limits of your command by the President, from physical disqualification to follow the Government any longer, and I therefore desire to know if I allow the staff officer left with me can be included in the arrangement upon the same terms, as I cannot from my situation belong to any other command. It is not practicable for me to reach Greensborough immediately.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector-General.

CHARLOTTE, N. C., April 27, 1865.

General JOSEPH E. JOHNSTON,

Greensborough, N. C.:

It was found impracticable to transfer the records of the War Department further than this place, and they remain here under my charge. The President and Secretary of War impressed me with the necessity of their preservation in our own hands, if possible; it not, then by the enemy, as essential to the history of the struggle. On account of your superior knowledge of the condition of affairs, I desire to have your advise as to the disposition that shall be made of them.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector-General.

INSPECTOR-GENERAL'S OFFICE, ARMY OF TENNESSEE,

Near Greensborough, N. C., April 27, 1865.

Colonel E. J. HARVIE,

Inspector-General, Army of Tennessee:

COLONEL: In obedience to your instructions, I have the honor to submit the following statement of Colonel Cofer, provost-marshal-general, in reference to a loaded wagon train which left New Salem on or about the 21st instant. Colonel Cofer was informed by a man reporting to him that a train of eight wagons had left the neighorhood of New Salem, said to be ordered to South Carolina. Colonel Cofer