War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0793 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

HEADQUARTERS,

On Railroad, Eighteen Miles west of Raleigh,

April 12, 1865-7 p. m.

Lieutenant-General STEWART,

Commanding Stewart's and Lee's Corps:

GENERAL: Lieutenant-General Hardee directed me, when I left him in Raleigh, to say that you would move to-morrow at sunrise with your own and Lee's corps in the direction of the railroad bridge over Haw River.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ARCHER ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

P. S. -I expect you to notify Lieutenant-General Lee of the order to march. General Johnston will probably be here to-night.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,

April 12, 1865-7 p. m.

Lieutenant-General STEWART,

Commanding, &c.:

DEAR GENERAL: Our operator sends me the following:

The operator at Greensborough says General Lomax, with Lee's cavalry, has arrived at Danville and says Lee, far capitulating, is now resting on Appomattox and Staunton Rivers, collecting his army and supplies. Raiders have cut communication between Danville and General Lee; therefore nothing received from him.

Respectfully,

ARCHER ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. ANDERSON'S DIVISION, STEWART'S CORPS,

Five Miles in rear of General Stewart's Headquarters,

April 12, 1865-9 p. m.

Captain W. D. GALE,

Asst. Adjt. General, Stewart's Corps, Army of Tennessee:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report the arrival in this camp of my command, infantry, artillery, and trains. No report of stragglers has yet been received, but officers are of opinion that by extrodinary exertion and slow marching they have lost no men to-day. Captain Wheaton's battery is also encamped here, and will move in the morning at 6 o'clock with Rhett's battalion of artillery. The infantry will march at 7 a. m. in the morning.

Very respectfully,

PATTON ANDERSON,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS LEE'S CORPS,

One Mile beyond Cross-Roads, April 12, 1865.

Captain GALE,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: I am going into camp here, having marched fifteen miles and there being no good camp short of four miles. Thereis a good camp for your corps two miles and a half short of this-just this side