War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0781 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -CONFEDERATE.

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two others, if more convenient, provided Johnston's battalion from Salisbury be not there already. Having just arrived here and not being conversant with the general's wishes or intentions, I beg to ask instructions necessary in this regard. Will probably leave here to-morrow.

GEORGE WM. BRENT,

Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

RALEIGH, N. C., April 10, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel ARCHER ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Smithfield, N. C.:

General Beauregard has just left for Danville and directs me to remain here in charge of his books, trains, &c. Be good enough to keep me advised, in cipher, of any movements, so that I may act promptly and intelligently.

GEORGE WM. BRENT,

Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HILLSBOROUGH, April 10, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel ARCHER ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: In obedience to orders from army headquarters I reported at this place. I find that of the artillery belonging to the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, the following batteries are at the front, viz, Le Gardeur's, with General Taliaferro; Stuart's, with General Taliaferro; Kanapaux's (J. T.), with General Stevenson; Earle's, with General Hampton; Brooks', with General McLaws; Anderson's with General McLaws. Bridges', Wheaton's, Parker's, Walter's, and Zimmerman's batteries have been equipped and sent to the front. Bachman's and Abell's batteries have been equipped and would have lfet for Smithfield on the 11th and 12th, respectively, but have been ordered by telegram, of this date, from General Beauregard to proceed to Greensborough. This leaves but three batteries to be equipped to complete the ten contemplated, and Johnston's battalion, not yet arrived, will be the basis of the three batteries to be fitted out. There are no batteries from this place now at Greensborough. I inclose a statement showing the condition (in certain particulars) of the remaining batteries belonging to the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. I have personally examined the condition of the horses in thsoe batteries and find them in bad order. Three of the batteries from this place now at Greensborough. I inlose a statement showing the condition (in certain particulars) of the remaining batteries belonging to the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. I have personally examined the condition of the horses in those batteries and find them in bad order. Three of the batteries could hardly be moved from camp with their present teams, and none of them are fit for the field. All the best horses were selected to equip the batteries sent tothe front, and those remaining are weka and in poor condition. Some of the animals are young with good frames and could, with a month or six weeks' good pasturage and feed, be made serviceable, but a large ny worthless for artillery purposes. If Johnston's battalion requires many horses to equip it it will be extremely difficult to furnish anything approaching an efficient supply from these here. By reference to the inclosed statement you will perceive that some of the companies are so reduced as to come within the consolidation law. What is to be done with them when Johnston's battalion shall have been filled up and the ten batteries contemplated cmpleted? General Johnston suggested that the residue material should be sent by rail to Charlotte or Chester, but in view of the large amount of material and the effective strength of the companies, I desire to submit the matter a new for instructions. By stripping the