War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0704 OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. S., S. GA., AND E. FLA. Chapter LIX.

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hood of Bentoville. It is represented that they are in a suffering condition for the want of proper supplies. There is no surgeon to attend them. The general wishes you to take immediate steps to relieve the condition of these men. Such as are able to be moved he wishes brought to the railroad.

I am, doctor, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

KINLOCH FALCONER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

OFFICE CHIEF QUARTERMASTER, ARMY OF THE SOUTH,

Near Smithfield, N. C., March 27, 1865.

Lieutenant General A. P. STEWART,

Commanding Army of Tennessee:

GENERAL: I am directed by the general commanding to call upon you for a report of the number of men in your army now actually barefooted; also for the number of men whose shoes are so badly worn that a march of three days will render them barefooted.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. B. McMICKEN,

Chief Quartermaster.

HEADQUARTERS,

March 27, 1865.

General J. E. JOHNSTON, Commanding:

GENERAL: There are four brigades of Wheeler's corps absent at present, viz, Iverson's, Ferguson's, Lewis', and Hannon's. All of these cannot be needed in South Carolina, and I respectfully requesrt that at least two brigades be ordered to report here. As I understand that Iverson and Ferguson constitute Young's division, I suggest that the others be brought on. I beg you also to send orders to the officers in South Carolina and Georgia by telegraph to arrest and send on at once all absentees from the cavalry.

I am, very respectfully, yours,

WADE HAMPTON,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

March 27, 1865.

General JOHNSTON:

GENERAL: As Logan's brigade is very small, I recommend that the Second South Carolina Regiment be added to it temporarily. This latter regiment will be able to do much better service if brigaded than if left to act alone. I can always send cavalry to any point you may desire covered. I am desirous of trying to break the railroads, and I wish that you would direct General Rains, who is Raleigh to send some torpedoes to me by an efficient man. I think the bridge at Kinston can be destroyed, as well as a portion of the railroad. If the enemy uses the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad we can easily break that. I shall move my headquarters to-day to some point near Little River. Wheeler is directed to put his command at or near Pikeville, and Butler will cover the roads between the two rivers.

I am, very respectfully, yours,

WADE HAMPTON,

Lieutenant-General.