War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0691 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -CONFEDERATE.

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HEADQUARTERS CHEATHAM'S CORPS,

March 25, 1865.

Captain W. D. GALE,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of Tennessee:

CAPTAIN: In compliance with orders from headquarters Army of Tennessee, I have the honor to report the number of Federal prisoners captured by this command in the engagement on the 19th instant, as follows:

Cleburne's division. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Bate's division. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

----

Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

Respectfully, captain, your obedient servant,

JAMES D. PORTER, JR,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

(For Major-General Cheatham.)

ATKINSON'S HOUSE, March 25, 1865-10. 15 a. m.

General J. E. JOHNSTON,

Commanding:

GENERAL: General Wheeler reports that a force of the enemy yesterday crossed the Little River at Kennedy's Bridge. I have directed General Wheeler to send a part of his force on the other side of Little River and watch any movements of the enemy there. As soon as I am satisfied that the enemy have retired on this road I will leave a picket on it and move the rest of my force over to the other road. I am now holding Moccasin Creek.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WADE HAMPTON,

Lieutenant-General.

ATKINSON'S HOUSE, March 25, 1865.

General JOHNSTON:

GENERAL: General Lipscomb has just shown me an order from General Bragg directing him to take his regiment and the Sixth North Carolina to operate on the Cape Fear River. This latter regiment belongs to Dearing's brigade, Army of Northern Virginia, and it is very desirable that it should rejoin its proper command. There are but three other small regiments with Dearing, and I think it was contemplated by General Lee to order it on to Virginia. I request most respectfully and earnestly that you will have the order sending it to the Cape Fear River revoked. I venture to express a doubt as to the expediency of sending either of these regiments there. In the first place, any regiment going tot hat section would have to travel over the country which has been exhausted by the enemy, and the horses would perish. Then, the South River does not form a junction with the Cape Fear River until it comes within fifteen miles of Wilmington, though it runs parallel with it for many miles. Any cavalry placed between these rivers would be in a perfect trap, whilst the South River would prevent any operation to the east of it. Why should the enemy desire to use the Cape Fear River? Kinston is nearer to Goldsborough than