War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0666 OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA. Chapter LIX.

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quence have been robbed and abused by scoundrels dressed as U. S. soldiers. Burglaries and robberies of houses and stores have been on the increase, and most of them traced to idle negroes. I compel my soldiers to be in quarters at 9 o'clock, and shall compel colored persons also who have not proper passes. The fatal stabbing of a white soldier of Thirteenth Connecticut Volunteers by a negro has brought matters to a climax. This and my instructions respecting vagrants (white and black) has been called oppressive. I can only state that it is necessary, and if it is wrong or ill advised I can only request to be relieved, for unless it is enforced I cannot do justice to myself nor the service in remaining in command of the post. A check is needed or the place will be run over by a multitude of vagrant, idle persons who are rapidly becoming thieves. I have to acknowledge the authority of the major-general commanding to impose the tax for the necessary expenses of the post. Upon careful examination I think one-half of one per cent. will be sufficient, and that I trust may be reduced shortly, as all expenses are kept at the minimum. A monthly statement of vicil fund shall be forwarded to headquarters. While I have carefully followed out General Sherman's order to assist the inhabitants to cultivate their crops by leaving to them the poorest of the mules and gocarts which formerly belonged to the C. S. quartermaster's department, I have still succeeded in collecting for the use of the troops an ample train. Every post has wagons and mules, so that no expense is incurred by hire for transportation of rations, &c., and having a good park on hand and at present not much for them to do, I have telegraphed for instructions whether I shall from time to time hire them out at high rates to private parties to haul cotton to the boats and flats. It would certainly bring a revenue in to the Government and assist the movement of staples. I have not hired any out as yet, except in one single instance of fifteen teams for one day on a lot of cotton ina dangerous position, when the owner (T. T. Wright) could not obtain wagons elsewhere. In departing from my urle in this instance I was guided soldely by the exingencies of the case and the high character and stout Union principles of Mr. Wright, who had been recommended highly to me by responsible persons from headquarters as worthy of assistance for the persecution he had met with on account of his Union sentiments. I state the case thus plaintly because I have in all other cases refused to have captured or Government teams used for private goods until my instructions would permit. I inclose papers respecting the Confederate Government and cotton-press at this post, copy of contract, &c. * Before leasing I wrote to the commanding officer of the District of Savannah whether I should lease it for the benefit of the Government. He authorized me to do so. You will notice that the lease (paper A) is made subjecft to be canceled by the commanding officer of District of Savannah, his successor, or by higher authority. It is, therefore, so that the major-general can take action on it at any time. Since that time a claimant appeared. I inclose copy of claim (B), with indorsement. I inclose copies of papers (C, D, and E) which tend to prove it to have been Confederate property, and that Mr. Baldwin's claim is not a just one; and I would further state that additioanl proofs can be advanced showing that the Confederate Government paid for the press, &c. Feeling myself justified in my course I shall retain possession until it is otherwise decided by the major-general commanding. I

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*Omitted.

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