War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0647 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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Let the memory of Knoxville, Resaca, Dallas, Kenesaw, Chattahoochee, and Atlanta; of Columbia, Franklin, and Nashaville; of Fort Wagner, Drewry's Bluff, Cold Harbor, Petersbur, Richmond, and Fort Harrison; of Fort Fisher, Adnerson, Wilmington, and Kinston, ever remind us of the pricelless value of our free institutions, and incite in us that faithful discharge of our duties as citizens which alone can secure to us and to our posterity the full fruits of the victories which as soldiers we have won.

My comrades, I did you farewell, and may Almighty God bless and rewaed you for patriotsim and fidelity in the cause of libery and Union, and may he comfort and protedt the widows and orphan children of our comrades who have given their lives for their country.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 303.

Washington, june 14, 1865.

1. Leave of absence is hereby granted the following officers: Bvt. Major General John W. Geary, U. S. Volunteers, for thirty days. Bvt. Major General W. t. Ward, U. S. Volunteers, for thirty days.

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By order of the Secretary of War:

E. D. TOWSEND,

Brigadier-General.

HDQRS. NORTHERN DIST., DEPT. OF THE SOUTH,

Charleston, S. C., June 14, 1865.

Major General Q. A. GILLMORE,

Commanding Department of the South:

GENERAL: I have confined in the city jail Mr. Trenholm, late rebel Secretary of the treasury, and on parole Mr. T. D. Wagner, manager of the firm of Trenholm, Fraser & Co. What shall I do with them?

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN P. HATCH,

Brevet Major-General, Commanding.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. FORUTEENTH ARMY CORPS, Numbers 17.

Washington, D. C., June 15, 1865.

SOLDIERS OF THE FOURTEENTH CORPS:

Since he assumed command of the corps your general has seen many occasions when he was proud of your courage, your endurance, and your gallant and soldierly conduct. If he did not praise you then, it was because in view of what yet remained for you to do, what enemies to meet, what hardships, and what dangers to encounter, it seemed wrong for you or for him to pride yourselves upon the past, rest upon laurels already won; but now when the battle and the march are over and the victory won, when many of you are about to return to your homes, and when all have lost the roar of hostile cannon in the plaudits of welcoming friendsand the wreths of vicotry, he congratulates you on the part which you have shared, in cammon with your comrades of the armies of the