War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0476 OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA. Chapter LIX.

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FLAG-SHIP PHILADELPHIA,

Charleston Harbor, May 9 [11?], 1865.

Major General Q. A. GILLMORE,

Commanding Department of the South, Hdqrs. Hilton Head:

GENERAL: Your communication of May 10 has been received. In reply, the steamer Amazon will be turned over to you for the use of the army, as you requested. Please forward receipts in duplicate for the Amazon and Governor Troup, signed by the proper officer, that they may be filed at the Navy Department. The receipts should state that the vessels are received at their appraised value, subject to the decision of the prize court or authorities at Washington.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. A. DAHLGREN,

Rear-Admiral, Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 224.

Washington, May 12, 1865.

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2. The leave of absence granted Brigadier General W. P. Carlin, U. S. Volunteers, by the commanding general Fourteenth Army Corps, dated March 28, 1865, is hereby extended fifteen days, on the expiration of which he will report for duty to the commanding general Middle Military Division.

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By order of the Secretary of War:

E. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE,

Washington, D. C., May 12, 1865.

Major General W. T. SHERMAN:

DEAR GENERAL: I saw General Rawlins this a. m., and delivered your report, and your private letter for General Grant I gave to Colonel Bowers as the general was not in the office. I saw the Secretary of War, who told me he sent for me in order to place me in charge of the Freedmen's Bureau. After I had conversed with him about that for some little time he inquired where you were and talked with me quite at length respecting your terms of settlement with Johnston. I told him that you were incensed at the publication that appeared over his signature. He said in reply that you put the Government entirely on the defensive by announcing in orders that terms had been agreed upon which would give peace from the Potomac to the Rio Grande, &c. This order appeared in the morning papers, and on account of it, in order to show the people why the Government broke the peace established, he deemed it proper to publish some of the reasons for disapproving the terms. He deprecated the spirit of the press, but said that he thought that he himself had to bear his share of newspaper abuse. General Rawlins intimated that General Grant's confidence in yourself was unabated, and that he thought it best for your sake to withhold your letter from publication till he could see you. Hoping to see you here soon,

I remain, yours, sincerely,

O. O. HOWARD,

Major-General.