War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0454 OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA. Chapter LIX.

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MANCHESTER, VA., May 10, 1865--12 m.

(Received 3 p. m.)

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

Washington:

Your dispatch directing me to march my command to Alexandria just received. I have ordered the Army of Georgia to move to-morrow, and the Army of the Tennessee will follow next day.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

RICHMOND, VA., May 10, 1865--10. 30 a. m.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I beg leave to withdraw for the present my recommendation of Schofield as military governor of North Carolina. It is represented to me that he and General Blair were the principal advisers of Sherman in his armistice with the rebel General Johnston. If so, he is not a proper person to command in North Carolina. I therefore suspend my recommendation for further developments.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

RICHMOND, VA., May 10 [9?], 1865.

Major General W. T. SHERMAN,

City Point:

You have not had during this war nor have you now a warmer friend and admirer than myself. If in carrying out what I knew to be the wishes of the War Department in regard to your armistice I used language which has given you offense it was unintentional, and I deeply regret it. If fully aware of the circumstances under which I acted I am certain you would not attribute to me any improper motives. It is my wish to continue to regard and receive you as a personal friend. With this statement I leave the matter in your hands.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, Manchester, Va., May 10, 1865.

General H. W. HALLECK, U. S. Army,

Richmond, Va.:

GENERAL: I received your cipher dispatch last evening, and have revolved it in my mind all night in connection with that telegraphic message of April 26 to Secretary Stanton, and by him rushed with such indecent haste before an excited public. I cannot possibly reconcile the friendly expressions of the former with the deadly malignity of the latter, and cannot consent to the renewal of a friendship I had prized so highly till I can see deeper into the diabolical plot than I now do. When you advised me of the assassin Clark being on my track I little dreamed he would turn up in the direction and guise he did, but thank God I have become so blase to the dangers to life and reputation by the many vicissitudes of this cruel war, which some people are resolved shall never be over, that nothing surprises me. I will march my army through