War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0367 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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to send a staff officer here, with the necessary forms of obligation, to parole my command from this point? I am extremely anxious to get my command away from this place as soon as possible, being unable to subsist my men and horses without subjecting the citizens to suffering and want.

Respectfully requesting an early answer by telegraph, I am, respectfully, yours,

R. H. ANDERESON,

Brigadier-General.

HILLSBOROUGH, May 1, 1865.

Major-General SCHOFIELD:

GENERAL: The horses of my command have been without food for three days; are in a starving condition. General Johnston's quartermaster at Greensborough telegraphs me that he is unable to supply, and I can take none from the citizens of this vicinity without subjecting them to suffering and want. Will you not send me to-day 300 sacks of corn? I would like to come up to Raleigh to-day and see you in person. if agreeable to you. Please telegraph me.

R. H. ANDERSON,

Brigadier-General.

RALEIGH, N. C., May 1, 1865.

Brigadier-General ANDERSON,

Hillsborough, N. C.:

I will send a staff officer with blanks, &c., to parole your command. General Johnston informs me that General Hardee is on his way here. If you desire to come with I shall be pleased to see you.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

GREENSBOROUGH, May 1, 1865.

COMMANDING OFFICER CONFEDERATE FORCES, Charlotte, N. C.:

By orders from General Schofield, commanding U. S. forces in North Carolina, I am directed to parole the troops under your command in accordance with the agreement between General Johnston, C. S. Army, and General Sherman, U. S. Army, entered into on the 26th of April last. I will be in Charlotte to-morrow. Please have duplicate muster-rolls of all the officers and men of your command, including patients in hospitals, in readiness for me.

Very respectfully, yours,

F. E. WOLCOTT,

Major and Judge-Advocate, U. S. Army.

GREENSBOROUGH, May 1, 1865.

Lieutenant-Colonel CAMPBELL:

I am having 15,000 paroles printed here. Shall need no more. Should not something be inserted after the words "to take up arms against the United States" in the parole? There are many quartermasters, commisaries, and telegraph operators, &c., here.

WM. HARTSUFF,

Brevet Brigadier-General.