War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0347 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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crossing the Neuse River, and encamping my division about one mile from the pontoon bridge. My headquarters are near Rogers' Cross-Roads.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. R. WOODS,

Brevet Major-General.

HDQRS. FOURTH DIVISION, FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Near Neuse River, N. C., April 29, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel MAX. WOODHULL,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Fifteenth Army Corps:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that having assumed temporary command of this division in the absence of General Corse I moved from the vicinity of Raleigh in compliance with your orders, breaking camp at 9. 30 a. m. and pursuing the direct Louisburg road, crossing Crabtree Creek and Neuse River, placing the division in bivouac near the latter. My arrival at the point designated was necessarily late, owing to the fact that I was detained at Crabree Creek until 1 p. m. by General Hazen's trains, which were until nearly midday in getting out of park. My troops have marched a distance of eleven miles.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ELLIOTT W. RICE,

Brigadier-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF GEORGIA, Numbers 59.

Raleigh, N. C., April 29, 1865.

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II. Lieutenant Keeler, commanding section of the Nineteenth Indiana Battery, with Fourteenth Army Corps, will turn over to the quartermaster of the artillery brigade of that corps the horses now in his possession and will transport his guns and men by railroad to Goldsborough, N. C., and join the balance of his battery. The commanding officer of the battery will report by letter to Major-General Schofield, commanding Department of North Carolina.

By command of Major-General Slocum:

ROBT. P. DECHERT,

Major and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS,

HDQRS. 14TH ARMY CORPS, Numbers 37.

Near Raleigh, N. C., April 29, 1865.

The troops of the corps will move to-morrow as follows: General Baird, marching at sunrise, will take the most direct and practicable road to Oxford. He will take charge of the pontoon train (the commanding officer of which is hereby directed to report to him for orders), and keeping it to the front of his trains will direct the construction of a bridge over the Neuse River, immediately upon reaching that stream, without further orders. General Walcut will move in the rear of General Baird. General Morgan will remain in his present camps until the following morning. During the prospective march each division