War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0330 OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA. Chapter LIX.

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HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, Raleigh, N. C., April 27, 1865.

Major ESTES,

Durham's:

The dispatches sent to or taken by General Kilpatrick to-night cover the answer to General Johnston's telegram. Please notify General Johnston's officer to that effect.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, Raleigh, N. C., April 27, 1865.

Major-General KILPATRICK,

Commanding Cavalry:

GENERAL: I send you herewith a package for General Johnston, which the general-in-chief wishes you to forward by an officer and two or three men. Let the officer go out without any flag of truce and deliver to the first Confederate officer who will agree to deliver it, taking his receipt. If your officer does not meet any C. S. Army officer let him be instructed to proceed until he finds General Johnston.

With respect,

L. M. DAYTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPT. OF NORTH CAROLINA, ARMY OF THE OHIO, Numbers 31.

Raleigh, N. C., April 27, 1865.

The commanding general has the great satisfaction of announcing to the army and to the people of North Carolina that hostilities within this State have definitely ceased; that for us the war is ended, and it is hoped that peace will soon be restored throughout our country. It is now the duty of all to cultivate friendly relations with the same zeal which has characterized our conduct of the war, that the blessings of union, peace, and material prosperity may be speedily restored to the entire country. It is confidently believed and expected that the troops of this army and the people of North Carolina will cordially unite in honest endeavors to accomplish this great end. All good and peaceable citizens will be protected and treated with kindness, while those who disturb the peace or violate the laws will be punished with the severity of martial law. The troops will be distributed so as best to secure the interests of the U. S. Government and protect the people until a civil government can be established in harmony with the Constitution and laws of the United States. The most perfect discipline and good conduct are enjoined upon all officers and soldiers, and cordial support upon all good citizens. All who are peaceably disposed are invited to return to their homes and resume their industrial pursuits. Such as have been deprived of their animals and wagons by the hostile armies will be temporarily supplied, as far as practicable, upon application to the nearest provost-marshal, by loans of the captured property in possession of the quartermaster's department. The needy will also be supplied, for the time being, with subsistence stores from the commissary department. It will be left to the judicial department of the Government to punish those political leaders who are responsible for