War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0318 OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA. Chapter LIX.

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NEW BERNE, N. C., April 26, 1865.

Major-General SCHOFIELD,

Raleigh:

By an agreement entered into this a. m. with Colonel J. N. Whitford, all of the forces under his command, which consist of all the organizations in Eastern North Carolina, surrender upon the same terms granted to Lee's army.

I. N. PALMER,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Hilton Head, April 26, 1865. (Received 27th.)

Major General W. T. SHERMAN:

Your dispatch from Raleigh, dated the 24th instant, announcing the truce at an end and the resumption of hostilities, is received, and the order to send couriers to General Wilson at Macon, with instructions to act according to original instructions, has been attended to. General Potter's expedition to Sumterville and Camden has been very successful. He destroyed 32 locomotives and 250 cars. The destruction was most complete. He did not find it necessary to go to Florence, as the rolling stock of the railroad was all between Sumterville, Manchester, and Camden, with but a trifling exception.

Your obedient servant,

Q. A. GILLMORE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF FLORIDA,

FOURTH SEPARATE BRIGADE, DEPT. OF THE SOUTH,

Jacksonville, Fla., April 26, 1865.

Major W. L. M. BURGER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of the South:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of telegram from General Sherman announcing suspension of hostilities. A few days since I transmitted to you a copy of communication from Major General Sam. Jones, C. S. Army, commanding Confederate forces in Florida, in which he informed me that a suspension of arms had been agreed upon between the belligerents. On the 24th I received a dispatch from General Jones, requesting an interview with me at a point ten miles from this place, at 3 p. m. yesterday, to which I acceded. One or two questions were proposed by him to which I was unable to give any answer until I received official information of the suspension of hostilities, the most important of which are the following: First. Are escaped negroes to be received by us, and are persons from within our lines to be allowed to go out for the purpose of inducing negroes to migrate within our lines? I stated that I could give no answer in the case until I received official notice of the suspension. Will you request the major-general commanding to give instructions as early as possible on these two points. It appears to me that good faith requires that we should not send any agents within the lines to offer any inducements to the negroes to leave. At the same time such as voluntarily leave and effect, unaidedby us, their escape should be received as hitherto. In other words, extending to the colored men the same rights and privileges as are usually extended to the inhabitants of the seat of war during suspension