War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0293 Chapter LIX] CORESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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RALEIGH, N. C., April 24, 1865-9 a. m.

Hon EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I reached here this morning, and delivered to General Sherman the reply to his negotiations with Johnston. He was not surprised, but rather expented their rejection. Word was immediately sent to Johnston terminating the truce, and information that civil matters could not be entertained in any convection between army commanders. General Sherman has been guided in his negotiations with Johnston entirely by what he though waas precedent authorized by the President. He had before him the terms given by me to Lee's army and the call of the rebel legislature of Virginia, uthorized and myself. At the time of the agreement General Sherman did not know of the withdrawal of authority for the meeting of that legislature. The moment he learned through the papers that authority for the meeting had been withdrawn he communicated the fact to Johnston as having bearing on the negostiations had.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

GREENSBOROUGH, N. C.,

In the Field, April 24, 1865.

General W. T. SHERMAN, Commanding:

If forwarding the following dispatch I respectfully suggest the propriety of reasing the prisoners taken at Macon and withdrawal of General Wilson's troops to some point beyond that at which he received from General Cobb information of the armistice:

HDQRS. CAVALRY CORPS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Macon, Ga., April 21, 1865.

Your dispatch of yesterday is just received. I shall at once proceed to carry out your instructions if proper arrangements can be made to have sugar, coffee, and clothing sent form Savannah to Augusta. They can be brought hither by the way of Atlanta by rail, or they can be sent by boat direct to this place from Darien. I shall be able to get forage, bread, and meat from Southeastern Georgia. The railroad from Atlanta do Dalton or Cleveland cannot be reapired in three months. I have arranged to sent an officer at once via Enfaula to General Canby with a copy of your dispatch. General Cobb will also notify General Taylor of the armistice. I have about 3,000 prisoners of war, including Generals Cobb, Smith, Mackall, Mercer, and Robertson. Can't you arrange with General Johnston for their immediate release? Please answer at once. I shall start officer to you to morrow.

J. H. WILSON,

Brevet Major-General, Commanding.

J. E. JOHNSTON,

General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, Raleigh, N. C., April 24, 1865-6 a. m.

General JOHNSTON,

Commaning Confederate Army, Greensborough:

You will take notice that the truce or suspension of hostilities agreed to between us will cease in forty-eigh hours affter this is received at your lines under first of the articles of our agreement.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.