War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0286 Chapter LIX] OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA.

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very large, including not only the plunder of Richmond banks, but previous accumulations. A dispatch received by this Department form Richmond says:

It is stated here by respctable parties that the ammont of spiece taken south by Jeff. Davis and his partisans is very large, including not only the plunder of the Richmond banks, but previous accumulations. They hope, it is said, to make terms with General Sherman or some other Southern commander, by which they will be pemitted, with their effects, including this gold plunder, to go Mexico or Europe. Johnoston's negotiations look to this end.

After the cabinet meeting last night General Grant started for North Carolina to direct operations against Johnston's army.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

BEAUFORT, N. C., April 23, 1865-6 p. m.

Hon E. M STANTON,

Secretary of War, Washington:

Have just reached hera and will start for Raleigh as soon as train can be obtained. No news here from Sherman. I shall not telegraph to him that I am on the way.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, Raleigh, N. C., April 23, 1865-7 a. m.

General JOSEPH E. JOHNSTON,

Commanding Confederate Army, Greensborough:

GENERAL: Your communication of 2,30 p. m. yesterday is received. My line of communication with General Wilson is not secure eneough for me to confuse him by a change in mere words; of course the 'statu quo" is mutual, but I leave him to apply it to his case according to his surroundings. I would not instruct him to undo all done by him between the actual date of our agreement and the time the knowledge reached him. I beg therefore to leave him free to apply the rule to his own case. Indeed, I have almost exceeded the bounds of prudence in checking him without the means of direct communication, and only did so on my absolute faith in your pervonal character. I inclose a dispatch for General Wilson in cipher, which translated simply advises him to keep his command well together, and to act according to the best of his ability, doing as little harm to the country as possible until he knows hostilities are resumed.

I am, withc respect,

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, U. S. Army.

[Inclosure.]

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, Raleigh, N. C., April 23, 1865.

General WILSON:

Cipher dispatch received. There is a general suspension of hostilities awaiting the assent of our new President to certain civil points before making a final military convection of peace. Act according to your own good sense until you are certain the war is over. Keep possession of some key point that will secure your present advan-