War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0272 Chapter LIX] OPERATIONS IN N. C., S., C., S. GA., E. FLA.

Search Civil War Official Records

sympathy, and for the other calsses of Northern men who were coerced or wheedled into asquiescence or neutrality, all I can say is that I will not sit in judgment on them, but I shall never confide in their courage, manliness, or virtue.

I am, with respect,

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

NEW BERNE, April 21, 1865.

Major-General SHERMAN:

The members of the legisltaure now here request me to say to you that they do not expect an early meeting, but they desire to have an interview with you, hoping to aid the pacifiacation of the State and make suggestions thereto. Can they go to Raleigh?

I. N. PALMER,

Brigadier-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, April 21, 1865.

Brigadier-General PALMER,

New Berne, N. C.:

The State legistature can do no good here at present, and not until the military authorities have settled military matters. Then they will be duly notified and can come up.

L. M. DAYTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Hilton Head, S. C., April 21, 1865.

Rear-Admiral J. A. DAHLGREN,

Commaning South Atlantic Blockading Squadron:

ADMIRAL: I have the honor to inform you that I have received dispatches from Major-General Sherman, dated the 19th, instant, informing me that he has entered into a convection with General Johnston, whereby all the Confederate armies are to be dispbanded, and a general suspension of hostilities is agreed upon until certain terms are approved at Washington. I am directed by him to cease all further destruction of public and private property, and to make dispositions looking to a general peace. General Sherman was, at the date of his dispatches, at Raleigh, N. C.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Q. A. GILLMORE,

Major-General, Commanding.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH, Numbers 48. Hilton Head, S. C., April 21, 1865.

The commanding general announces with emotions of profound sorrow that a great and overpowering grief has fallen upon the nation. Our venerated and beloved President, Abraham Lincoln, has been taken from us by violence. In the very midst of our national rejoicings over the recent triumphs of the national arms, and on the anniversary