War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0258 Chapter LIX] OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA.

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HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, Raleigh, N. C., April 20, 1865.

Dr. W. J. HAWKINS,

President Raleigh and Gaston Railroad, Ridgeway:

SIR: Our roads is now in good working order to Wilmington and Morehead city. My construction party is now unemployed and can repair the Cedar Creek bridge very quick. I will send a train down to-morrow to the bridge. If you will meet Colonel Wright there he will agree with you as to repairs, &c. I have no objection to the restoration to you road and its use, but for a few days would like to borrow or rent of you some locomotives and cars. Any arrangement made with colonel Wright will be respected by me, and I think I am safe in the assurance that General Johnston will approve any bargain we may make.

Yours, truly,

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, Raleigh, N. C., April 20, 1865.

Colonel W. W. WRIGHT,

Superintendent, &c.:

COLONEL: The general directs that I inform you officially that he has sent a communication to the president of the Gaston railroad to the effect that you will start out to-morrow morning to look at the road, &c. He has asked Doctor Hawkins to meet you at the Cedar Creek bridge, and that he will aggrange with you about building the bridge, loaning trains, &c., anything you may agree on being satisfactory.

I am, colonel, with respect,

L. M. DAYTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT AND ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE,

Raleigh, N. C., April 20, 1865.

Capt P. A. TAYLOR,

Chief Signal Officer:

CAPTAIN: It is with great pleasure that I recommend to the favorable consideration of the Chief Signal Officer U. S. Army, and to all officers of the Army, and to all others whom it may concern, Captain Taylor and Lieutenant Sampson, signal officers, and Captain McClintock, acting signal officer, U. S. Army, and their signal detachment. Since I have been in command of the Department and Army of the Tennessee, from July 27, 1864, the officers and men above referred to have rendered me most faithful and valuable service. Before atlanta Captain McClintock and Lieutenant Sampson and their detachment of enlisted men were untiring in their labors, and from their signal stations before the besieged city watched the movements of the enemy day and night and kept me advised at all times of any changes made in the disposition of his troops. In the campaign against Savannah Captain McClintock and Lieutenant Sampson and their detachment were again of great service to me and to the general-in-chief. For three days and