War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0239 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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was assassinated by one who uttered the State motto of Virginia. At the same time the Secretary of State, Mr. Seward, whilst suffering from a broken arm, was also stabbed by another murdered, in his own house, but still survives, and his son was wounded, supposed fatally. It is believed by persons capable of judging that other high officers were designed to share the same fate. Thus it seems that our enemy, despairsin's tools. Your general does not wish to infer that this is universal, for he knows that the great mass of the Confederate Army would scorn to sanction such acts, but he velieves it the legitimate conphase which this war has assumed, and must now be prepared for it in its lastr and worst shape, that of assassins and guerrillas; but woe unto the people who seek to expend their wild passions in such a manner, for there is but one dread result.

By order of Major General W. T. Sherman:

L. M. DAYTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE,

Raleigh, N. C., April 17, 1865.

Major General JOHN A. LOGAN,

Commanding Fifteenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: Our noble President has been assassinated and is dead. Seward also, and his son. It is thought that Seward will live, but his son cannot. The assassins are said to have attempted Grant, but failed. They are reported on the track of Sherman, and the Secretary puts him on his guard. My heart is filled with gloom and sorrow. We have lost our noble head.

Respectfully,

O. O. HOWARD,

Major-General.

(Same to General Blair.)

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE.

[April 17, 1865.]

Major General J. A. LOGAN,

Commanding Fifteenth Army Corps, Morrisville:

GENERAL: If you have received a dispatch from me this a. m. with reference to one received from Washington, please not to publish it.

O. O. HOWARD,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE,

Raleigh, N. C., April 17, 1865. (Received 4 p. m.)

Major General F. P. BLAIR,

Commanding Seventeenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: The general commanding desires that the communication sent you announcing the assassination of the President be kept as secret as possible. You will please not publish it to your command.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. M. VAN DYKE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.