War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0225 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, Raleigh, N. c., April 15, 1865.

General KILPATRICK,

Durham's:

GENERAL: Your communicaiton of 11. 30 a. m. is received. I think Johnston is in earnest, for he knows well that the cause is hopeless. I will await his answer. Don't advance beyond Chapel Hill and Durham's till I hear from him and make new orders.

Yours,

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

LOUISBURG, N. C., April 15, 1865.

TO THE OFFICER ON COMMAND OF THE U. S. FORCES AT RALEIGH, N. C.:

SIR: In accordance with a resolution passed by the Board of Commissioners of the town of Louisburg, N. C., I hereby formally surrender this place to the authorities of the United States, and in behalf of our citizens desire and request that you will be pleased to send us a guard under a proper officer, to be stationed here, so as to preserve order and afford us that protection which under existing circumstances we feel authorized to claim under the Constitution and laws of the United States. Should you be good enough to comply with our wishes in this respect you may be well assured of our united co-operaiton. Messrs. J. Fuller and Dr. E. Malone are deputed as the bearers of this communication.

Most obediently, yours,

W. H. PLEASANTS,

Mayor of Louisbury.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, Raleigh, N. C., April 15, 1865.

W. H. PLEASANT, Esq.,

Mayor of Louisburg:

DEAR SIR: Your communication of this date is received. It is not my present intention to move any part of this army through Louisburg, and I do not think you will be molested in any manner; nor can I send a small detachment, because it would be exposed to danger from Hampton's cavalry. But I think I can promise you that events are in progress that will soon give peace to all the good people of North Carolina. Mr. William A. Graham, of Hillsborough, has gone to Governor Vance to assure him that he has my full promise of assistance and protection if he will return and maintain good order on the State. I am also now in correspondence with General Johnston, which I hope will result in an universal peace. The gentleman who bear this letter can explain, many things that will, I hope tend to allay any fears occasioned by the falsehoods circulated by the rebel cavalry.

I am, with respect, your obedient servant,

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, U. S. Army.

15 R R - VOL XLVII, PT III