War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0221 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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thatstate until twenty-two minutes after 7 o'clock, at which time he breathed his last. General Grant was published to be at the theater, but fortunately did not go. Vice-President Johnson now becomes Predient, and will take the oath of office and assume the duties to-day. I have no time to add more than to say that I find evidence that an assassin is also on your track, and I beseech you to be more heedful than Mr. Lincoln was of such knowledge.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

WASHINGTON, D. C., April 15, 1865.

Major-General SHERMAN:

It has been stated that when an assassin was chosen to kill Mr. Seward one also was sworn tomurder you. His name was sais to be Clark. He is about feet nine inches high, rather slender, high cheek bones, low forehead, eyes dark and sunken, very quiet, seldom or never speaks in company unless spoken to, has a large dark-brown mustache and large long goatee, hair much darker than whiskers, complexion rather sallow; while in Paris, March 12, wore dark-gray clothes, a wide-awake slouched hat. He is a Texan by birth, and has a very determined look. He had a confederate, whose name was Johnson, but no description of him is given.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSPPI,

Raleigh, April 15, 1865 - 9. 30 a. m.

General EATON:

Send this by a fleet steamer to Old Point Confort; from there must go by telegraphed.

W. T. SHERMAN.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Raleigh, N. C., April 1865.

General U. S. GRANT and SECRETARY OF WAR:

(Care of General Easton, New Berne or Morehead.)

I send copies of a correspondence begun with General Johnston, which, I think, will be followed by terms of capitulation. * I will accept the same terms as General Grant gave General Lee, and be careful not to complicate any points of civil policy. If any cavalry have started toward me caution them that they must be prepared to find our work done. It is now raining in torrents, and I shall await General Johnston's reply here, and will propose to meet him in person at Chapel Hill. I have invite Governor Vance to return to Raleigh with the civil officers of his State. I have met ex-Governor Graham, Mr. Bager, Moore, Golden, and other, all of whom agree that the war is over, and that the States of the South must resume their allegiance, subject to the Constitution and laws of Congress, and that the military power of the South must submit to the national arms. This great fact once admitted, all the detailes are easy of arrangement.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

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* See Johnston to Sherman to Johnston, April 14, pp. 206, 207.

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