War of the Rebellion: Serial 100 Page 0179 Chapter LIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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the city at the same time. As the confederate army is our only enemy I must take all possible precautions, as you are aware that they do not recognize you as an agent to commit them.

Yours, truly,

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, Gulley's Station, April 12, 1865.

The train of cars now here in charge of Colonel James G. Burr, of the staff of Governor Vance, can pass to and from Raleigh without let or hindrance until further orders. All guards and pickets will see that it is not interfered with or destroyed.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, N. C., April 12, 1865 - 5 p. m.

Colonel W. W. WRIGHT,

Superintendent of Construction:

COLONEL: Go on with repairs on railroad as high as Raleigh until you hear further from me. The damage is from a point five miles this side of the Little River bridge and extends to Mitchener's Depot, but is confined to the ties burnt. I cannot hear that the iron is damaged. It is important that the work should be pushed to any turnout above the Neuse bridge near Smithfield, so that if we are delayed about Raleigh we can haul from the end of the road without crossing the Neuse. All the bridges hereabouts are destroyed. We cross on pontoons, and are off for Raleigh, which I expect to reach to-morrow.

Yours,

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

U. S. STEAMER MATTABESETT,

District Sounds, North Atlantic Squadron,

Plymouth, N. C., April 12, 1865.

Major General W. T. SHERMAN, U. S. Army, &c.:

GENERAL: I have written three or four letters to you informing you of the state of affairs here, and any news I chanced to get, but Captain Truxtun tells me you have not heard from me. There is nothing going on here now. I still keep my vessels in the Chowan River at Winton ready to assist in any movement of the army thereabouts. Yesterday I sent two vessels to Murfreesborough and one to the Blackwater River to see what was going on. I expected to hear from you at Murfreesborough, Captain Truxtun having informed me that you started on the 10th. We have glorious news here which you have heard, probably, before this, that Lee and his army have surrendered to Grant. We also hear that Weldon is evacuated, the bridge burned, and the ram on the Roanoke at Edwards Ferry destroyed. I have written you about our expedition to Murfreesborough. You will have received the letter ere this.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. H. MACOMB,

Commander, Commanding.